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Daniela Weiner

June 12, 2020

Adviser: Konrad H. Jarausch and Karen Auerbach



Education

AB Vassar College, 2012 (History and Italian)
MS Johns Hopkins University, 2014 (Education)
MA University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2017 (Modern European History)
MA Thesis: “Tendentious Texts: Holocaust Representations and Nation-Rebuilding in East German, Italian, and West German Schoolbooks, 1949-1989”
PhD University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2020

Research Interests

In my dissertation, “Teaching a Dark Chapter: Representations of the Holocaust and the Second World War in East German, West German, and Italian History Textbooks, 1943-2000,” I explore how the post-fascist countries of East Germany, West Germany, and Italy taught about the Second World War and the Holocaust in their educational systems. The dissertation specifically explores the representations of these events in textbooks. My research interests include modern European history, comparative fascism, the history of knowledge transnational/comparative history, Holocaust history, Jewish Studies and Jewish history, as well as Digital Humanities.

Recent Publications

  • Weiner, Daniela R. P. “Tendentious Texts: Holocaust Representations and Nation-Rebuilding in East German, Italian, and West German Schoolbooks, 1949–1989.” Journal of Modern Jewish Studies 17, no. 3 (2018): 342-60. https://doi.org/10.1080/14725886.2017.1396745
  • Joshua Tait

    June 12, 2020

    Adviser: Benjamin Waterhouse


    Twitter

    Education

    B.A. The University of Canterbury (2011)
    M.A. The University of Canterbury (2013)
    M.A. Thesis: “The Right, With Lincoln: Conservative Intellectuals Interpret Lincoln, c. 1945-1989”
    PhD University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2020)

    Research Interests

    My dissertation is entitled Conservatism and the American Political Tradition. It analyzes conservative efforts to construct historical narratives about the American past. My broader research interests are 20th century conservatism, the American right, right-wing intellectual and political history and new trends in right-wing thought.

    Recent Publications

    “Mencius Moldbug and the Reactionary Enlightenment” in Key Thinkers of the Radical Right, (Oxford University Press, 2019)

    Larissa Stiglich

    June 12, 2020

    Adviser: Konrad H. Jarausch


    Twitter
    Curriculum Vitae

    Education

    B.A. Willamette University, 2011
    M.A. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2014
    M.A. Thesis: “A Crisis of Marriage? The Debate on Marriage Reform in the Social Democratic Weimar Women’s Press, 1919-1933”
    PhD University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2020

    Research Interests

    My dissertation, entitled “After Socialism: The Transformation of Everyday Life in Eisenhüttenstadt, 1980-Present,” explores Eisenhüttenstadt’s transformation from the thriving socialist model-city to a declining eastern German town on the Polish border. My research interests include urban history and everyday life in a united Germany and the former Eastern bloc.

    Recent Publications

  • Review of Back to the Postindustrial Future: An Ethnography of Germany’s Fastest-Shrinking City, by Felix Ringel. EuropeNow, published 2 July 2018.
  • Review of Four Germanys: A Chronicle of the Schorcht Family, by Donald S. Pitkin, The Public Historian 39:4 (November 2017): 182-183.
  • “Tales from the Archive: The Extra-Archival Encounters of a Contemporary German Historian,” Traces: The UNC-Chapel Hill Journal of History (Spring 2017): 218-221.
  • Robert Richard

    June 12, 2020

    Adviser: Harry L. Watson


    LinkedIn
    Curriculum Vitae

    Education

    A.B. Princeton University, 2009
    M.A. Yale University, 2011
    PhD University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2020

    Research Interests

    My dissertation is entitled: “Panic and Power: The First Great Depression in North Carolina, 1819-1833.” It explores the political, economic and social consequences of the first major financial collapse in American history—the Panic of 1819—through the lens of one critical yet understudied Southern state.

    Virginia Olmsted McGraw

    June 12, 2020

    Adviser: Donald Raleigh



    Education

    BA University of Virginia, 2013
    MA University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2015
    MA Thesis: “Nationalizing Fashion: Soviet Women’s Fashion and the West, 1959-1967”
    PhD University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2020
    Dissertation: “Soviet by Design: Fashion, Consumption, and International Competition During Late Socialism, 1948-1982”

    Research Interests

    My dissertation examines the evolution of a Soviet fashion industry and the primary state institution of clothing design, the All-Union House of Design (ODMO). I consider how, during the height of the Cold War, fashion became a vital arena for Soviet self-identity and rivalry with the West. I examine the ODMO’s place within the Soviet state and economy, the impact of the organization domestically and internationally, and the artistic and cultural contexts influencing design.

    Caroline Wood Newhall

    June 12, 2020

    Adviser: W. Fitzhugh Brundage


    Twitter
    Curriculum Vitae

    Education

    BA Trinity College, Hartford 2010
    MA University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2016
    PhD University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2020

    Research Interests

    Caroline Wood Newhall’s dissertation project, “‘Under the Rebel Lash’: Black Prisoners of War in the Confederate South,” examines the experiences of black Union soldiers who were captured and enslaved in the Confederacy. Using United States Colored Troops’ regimental service records, black veterans’ pension files, and correspondence in the Official Records of the war, her work emphasizes the intersections of race, labor, gender, and capital in wartime. She plans to expand her research into a genealogical project as she identifies formerly enslaved soldiers’ family and community networks through the USCT pensions.

    Gabriel Moss

    June 12, 2020

    Adviser: Richard J. A. Talbert


    Curriculum Vitaewww.gwmoss.com

    Research Interests

    Gabe Moss studies imperialism in the ancient Roman world, and in particular the relationship between Roman armies and the physical environment. His work draws heavily on cartography, GIS, and the digital humanities. He is a former Director of the Ancient World Mapping Center and the Digital History Lab, and works as a consultant on a variety of digital projects.

    Aubrey Lauersdorf

    June 12, 2020

    Adviser: Kathleen DuVal



    Education

    B.A. University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2012
    M.A. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2016
    PhD University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2020

    Research Interests

    My dissertation focuses on the Apalachee Indians, who historically lived in the Florida panhandle near present-day Tallahassee, but it is foremost a regional history that examines how the Apalachees shaped diplomacy, war, and trade in the Gulf Southeast in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. I take an ethnohistorical approach to this project, drawing on Spanish colonial documents and recent archaeology.

    Contrary to the common narrative of Spanish colonialism in the Gulf Southeast, I argue that Apalachee territory remained an Apalachee-controlled space during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and the Apalachees overwhelmingly dictated their diplomatic and trade relationships with both the Spaniards and their Indigenous neighbors. By situating themselves at the geographic and power center of an ever-expanding network of primarily Indigenous allies, the Apalachees became a regional diplomatic powerhouse. Yet when regional changes destabilized this diplomatic network in the latter half of the seventeenth century, the Apalachees invited both Indigenous allies and the Spaniards to undertake infrastructure- and settlement-building projects in their territory, cultivating these allies’ dependence on Apalachee land, labor, and resources and helping the Apalachees concentrate diplomatic power locally. By revealing St. Augustine’s marginal position in its diplomatic and trade relationships with the Apalachees and other allies, this project reconsiders diplomatic power in the Gulf Southeast more broadly. I demonstrate that framing the Gulf Southeast as “Spanish Florida” has obscured, rather than revealed, the dynamic, Indigenous-centered networks that determined the diplomatic and trade landscape of this region.

    I have received support for this research from a variety of sources, including the UNC Graduate School, UNC Medieval and Early Modern Studies, the University of Florida Libraries, and the Daughters of the American Revolution. I also have presented my research at a number of conferences, including the American Historical Association, the American Society for Ethnohistory, the Southern Historical Association, the Agricultural History Society, and the Southeastern Council of Latin American Studies, and workshops, including at the Huntington Library and at King’s College in London. At the University of North Carolina, I have taught courses including “Native North America,” “American Women’s History to 1865,” and “Colonialism, Power, and Resistance (co-taught).”

    Jeffrey Ryan Harris

    June 12, 2020

    Adviser: Lloyd S. Kramer


    Curriculum Vitae

    Education

    B.A. University of South Alabama, 2009
    M.A. (French) The Ohio State University, 2011
    M.A. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2013
    PhD University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2020

    Research Interests

    Jeffrey is an intellectual historian of France and the French colonial empire. His dissertation, “The Struggle for the General Will in the French and Haitian Revolutions,” examines competing ideas of the People’s “general will” in the emergence of proto-democratic political cultures and in the origins and trajectory of the Revolution.

    Recent Publications

    • “Jansenism, Popular Sovereignty, and the General Will in the Prerevolutionary Crisis.” In Belief and Politics in Enlightenment France: Essays in Honor of Dale K. Van Kley, edited by Daniel J. Watkins and Mita Choudhury. Oxford: The Voltaire Foundation’s Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment, 2019. Forthcoming.
    • The Pilgrim’s Progress in the Huguenot Diaspora: French Protestants and the Transnational Commodification of English Nationalism.” Book History, Vol. 21 (2018): 27-53.

    Dakota Irvin

    June 12, 2020

    Adviser: Donald J. Raleigh and Louise McReynolds


    Curriculum Vitae

    Education

    B.A. Gettysburg College, 2009
    M.A. University of Maryland, College Park 2013
    Ph.D.University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 2020

    Research Interests

    My research focuses on the Russian Revolution, Civil War, and early 1920s in the Urals city of Ekaterinburg. In particular, I am interested in issues concerning local government, political legitimacy, and the nature state power.

    Recent Publications

    “Blood on the Square: Perspectives on Revolutionary Violence and Disorder in 1905 Ekaterinburg,” Revolutionary Russia 29:1 (2016): 43-65

    With Evgenii Volkov, “‘Russkii Vashington,’ ili Sibirskii Diktator? Obrazy i otsenki A.V.
    Kolchaka kak verkhovnogo pravitelia v amerikanskoi presse (1918-1920),”
    Vestnik Sankt-Peterburgskogo Universiteta 4 (2016): 104-123