Chad Bryant

July 20, 2017

Chad Bryant

468 Hamilton Hall
bryantc@email.unc.edu

Curriculum Vitae


Research Interests:

Chad Bryant’s interests include nationalism and the urban experience in modern Central and Eastern Europe, with a particular focus on the lands of today’s Czech Republic. His current research project focuses on the capital city of Prague and questions of belonging in the modern era. He is also, with Kateřina Čapková and Diana Dumitru, embarking on a study of the Stalinist-era show trials in Czechoslovakia.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 140—The World Since 1945
  • HIST 260 – From Kings to Communists: East-Central Europe in the Modern Era
  • HNRS 353 – Magic Prague? Biographies of a Central European City
  • HIST 398 – Boom Cities: Urban Histories of a Modernizing Age, 1870-1914
  • HIST 783—An Introduction to Russian and East European History
  • HIST 784—Readings in East European History
  • Notable Publications:

    • Co-editor, with Arthur Burns and Paul Readman, Walking Histories, 1800-1914 (Palgrave, 2016)
    • Co-editor, with Paul Readman and Cynthia Radding, Borderlands in World History, 1700-1914 (Palgrave, 2014)
    • Prague in Black: Nazi Rule and Czech Nationalism (Harvard University Press, 2007)
    • “Habsburg History, Eastern European History… Central European History?” Central European History 51:1 (2018): 1-15
    • “War as Revolution of the Self: The Diaries of Vojtěch Berger” Střed/Centre 8:2 (2016): 9-34
    • “Zap’s Prague: The City, the Nation, and Czech Elites before 1848,” Urban History 40, 2 (May 2013): 181-201

    W. Fitzhugh Brundage

    July 20, 2017

    W. Fitzhugh Brundage

    560 Hamilton Hall
    brundage@email.unc.edu
    919-962-7533
    Curriculum Vitae
    Personal Website


    Research Interests:

    W. Fitzhugh Brundage’s general research interests are American history since the Civil War, with a particular focus on the American South. He has written on lynching, utopian socialism in the New South, white and black historical memory in the South since the Civil War, and the history of torture in the United States from the time of European contact to the twenty-first century. His current research project is a study of Civil War prisoner of war camps.

    Graduate Students:

    Courses Offered:

    • HIST 114—American History and Film
    • HIST 125—The Social History of Popular Music in Twentieth Century America

    Notable Publications:

    • Civilizing Torture: An American Tradition (Belknap Press, 2018)
    • Editor, Beyond Blackface: African Americans and the Creation of American Popular Culture, 1890-1930 (University of North Carolina Press, 2011)(
    • The Southern Past: A Clash of Race and Memory (Harvard University Press, 2008)
    • Editor, Where These Memories Grow: History, Memory, and Regional Identity in the American South (University of North Carolina Press, 2000)
    • A Socialist Utopia: The Ruskin Colonies in Tennessee and Georgia, 1894-1901 (University of Illinois Press, 1996)
  • Lynching in the New South: Georgia and Virginia, 1880-1930 (University of Illinois Press, 1993)
  • William L. Barney

    July 20, 2017

    William L. Barney

    462 Hamilton Hall
    wbarney@email.unc.edu
    919-962-5584


    Research Interests:

    Professor Barney’s research focuses on the nineteenth-century U.S., especially the antebellum South. He is currently researching a book on the cultural and economic politics of secession.

    Graduate Students:

    Courses Offered:

    • HIST 127—United States History to 1865
    • HIST 128—United States History Since 1865
    • HIST 565—Civil War and Reconstruction, 1848–1877
    • HIST 834—The Middle Period, 1815–1860
    • HIST 840—Civil War and Reconstruction, 1860–1876

    Notable Publications:

    • The Civil War and Reconstruction: A Student Companion (Oxford University Press, 2001)
    • Battleground for the Union: The Era of the Civil War and Reconstruction, 1848–1877 (Prentice Hall, Inc., 1990)
    • Passage of the Republic: An Interdisciplinary History of Nineteenth Century America (D.C. Heath, 1987)
    • The Secessionist Impulse: Alabama and Mississippi in 1860 (Princeton University Press, 1974)
    • Flawed Victory: New Perspective on the Civil War (Rowman & Littlefield, 1975)
    • The Road to Secession: A New Perspective on the Old South (Praeger, 1972)

    Cemil Aydin

    July 20, 2017

    Cemil Aydin

    424 Hamilton Hall
    caydin@email.unc.edu

    Curriculum Vitae


    Research Interests:

    Cemil Aydin’s interests focus on both Modern Middle Eastern History and Modern Asian history, with an emphasis on the international and intellectual histories of the Ottoman and Japanese Empires. He is particularly interested in historical processes that shape transnational racial and civilizational identities, such as Muslim, Asian, African. His research and publications offer new ways to understand the historical roots of the contemporary world order by describing the process of imperial era conflicts and decolonization, especially from the perspective of non-Western actors of the Muslim world and East Asia. Other research and teaching interests deal with questions of internationalism and orientalism, and modern world history.

    Graduate Students:

    Courses Offered:

    • HIST 394—International and Global History
    • HIST 460—Empires, Nations and Revolutions, 1750–1919

    Notable Publications:

  • Cemil Aydin, The Idea of the Muslim World: A Global Intellectual History (Harvard University Press, March 2017) –Italian translation:, L’idea di mondo musulmano. Una storia intellettuale globale (Einaudi Publishers, 2018)
  • Cemil Aydin and Juliane Hammer, “Muslims and Media: Perceptions, Participation, and Change” (special issue), Contemporary Islam (10 December 2009)
  • Cemil Aydin, The Politics of Anti-Westernism in Asia: Visions of World Order in Pan-Islamic and Pan-Asian Thought (New York: Columbia University Press, Global and International History Series, 2007)
  • Cemil Aydin and Juliane Hammer, “Critiques of the ‘West’ in Turkey, Iran and Japan: Occidentalism, the Crisis of Global Modernity and the Politics of Nationalism,” special issue of Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East 26:3 (Fall 2006). (Editor’s Introduction: 347-352)
  • Karen Auerbach

    July 20, 2017

    Karen Auerbach

    412 Hamilton Hall
    kauerbach@unc.edu

    Curriculum Vitae


    Research Interests:

    Professor Auerbach’s research focuses on the social history of Polish Jews in the nineteenth and twentieth century, especially issues relating to Jewish integration, urban life, and the evolution of Polish Jewish identifications. Her first book, published in 2013, is a microhistory of Jewish families who were neighbors in an apartment building in Warsaw after the Holocaust, exploring the reconstruction of communities and identifications in postwar Poland. She is currently researching the history of Jewish publishers of Polish books in the nineteenth and early twentieth century, in particular their involvement in Polish cultural, social and political circles, as well as information networks and the history of Yiddish in Eastern Europe during the Holocaust. Auerbach’s teaching focuses on modern Jewish history, East European Jewish History and the Holocaust.

    Graduate Students:

    Courses Offered:

    • HIST 190—The Search for Modern Jewish Identity
    • HNRS 353—Ghettos and Shtetls? Urban Life in East European Jewish History
    • HIST 485—Modern East European Jewish History and Culture
    • HIST 262—History of the Holocaust: The Destruction of the European Jews

    Notable Publications:

    • The House at Ujazdowskie 16: Jewish Families in Warsaw after the Holocaust (Indiana University Press, 2013)
    • “Memory of the Holocaust in Recent Polish Historiography.” Association for Jewish Studies Review 35.1. April 2011
    • “Insiders-Outsiders: Poles and Jews in Recent Polish-Jewish Fiction and Autobiography.” Co-author with Antony Polonsky. in Insiders and Outsiders: Dilemmas of East European Jewry, edited by Richard Cohen, Jonathan Frankel and Stefani Hoffman, 2010