Emma Jane Flatt

August 3, 2017

Emma Jane Flatt

418 Hamilton Hall / 506 Hamilton Hall
eflatt@email.unc.edu

Curriculum Vitae


Research Interests:

Emma Flatt’s research has focused on mentalities and practices in the courtly societies of the Indo-Islamicate Deccani Sultanates of South India. Her doctoral thesis, which she is currently revising for publication, explored the world of the peripatetic courtier, who moved across regions and between courts in search of generous patrons and focuses on three case studies of different “knowledges” that helped a courtier attain success: letter-writing, wrestling, and astrology. These three case studies illustrate the ways in which the acquisition of expertise in a particular knowledge provided the courtiers with opportunities for self-fashioning.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 135- History and Culture of Hindus and Muslims: South Asia to 1750
  • HIST 292- Gender in South Asia
  • HIST 490- The Mughal World: 1526-1707

Notable Publications:

  • Daud Ali and Emma J. Flatt, eds., Garden and Landscape Practices in Precolonial India: Histories from the Deccan, (Routledge, 2011)
  • “The Authorship and Significance of the Nujūm al-‘Ulūm: a sixteenth-century astrological encyclopaedia from Bijapur,” Journal of the American Oriental Society, 131.2 (April–June 2011).
  • “Young Manliness: Ethical Culture in the Gymnasiums of the Medieval Deccan”, in Anand Pandian and Daud Ali eds., Ethical Life in South Asia, (Indiana University Press, 2010)

Lisa A. Lindsay

August 1, 2017

Lisa A. Lindsay

521 Hamilton Hall
lalindsa@email.unc.edu
919-962-2178
Curriculum Vitae


Research Interests:

Lisa Lindsay’s research centers on the social history of West Africa, particularly Nigeria, and on links between Africa and other parts of the world. Although over time her primary focus has moved from gender to slavery, in all of her work she endeavors to understand large-scale processes through human-scale experiences, and to attend to African particularities as well as points of larger comparison and connection. Her most recent project is the contextualized biography of a South Carolina freedman who in the 1850s migrated to modern-day Nigeria, making trans-Atlantic connections that his descendants and their American relatives maintain to this day. She is also beginning work on a history of women and gender in the Atlantic slave trade.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

Notable Publications:

  • Atlantic Bonds: A Nineteenth Century Odyssey from America to Africa (UNC Press, 2017)
  • Biography and the Black Atlantic, co-edited with John Wood Sweet (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013)
  • Captives as Commodities (Prentice Hall, 2008)
  • Working with Gender: Wage Labor and Social Change in Southwestern Nigeria (Heinemann, 2003)
  • Men and Masculinities in Modern Africa, co-edited with Stephan Miescher (Heinemann, 2003)

Benjamin Waterhouse

August 1, 2017

Benjamin Waterhouse

473 Hamilton Hall
waterhou@email.unc.edu
919-962-2373
Curriculum Vitae


Research Interests:

Benjamin Waterhouse studies American politics, political culture, and capitalism in the twentieth century. He is interested in contests between economic groups, including business, labor, and the political class, and how the relationships among them shaped the broader contours of the American political tradition and American economic development. Waterhouse teaches courses on the history of business and economics, politics and political thought, and capitalism. His first book, Lobbying America: The Politics of Business from Nixon to NAFTA (Princeton University Press, 2014) explores the role that large, national business associations—and their lobbyists—played in shaping economic policy and conservative politics between the 1960s and the 1990s.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 89-FYS: America in the 1970s
  • HIST 364- The History of American Business
  • HIST 372 – Politics and Society Since the New Deal
  • HIST 398- American Political History in the Twentieth Century (undergraduate research seminar)
  • HIST 716- Graduate Colloquium in American History Since 1865
  • HIST 890 – American Economic History and the History of Capitalism
  • HNRS 353 – The History of the 2008 Financial Crisis

Notable Publications:

  • The Land of Enterprise: A Business History of the United States (Simon & Schuster, 2017)
  • Lobbying America: The Politics of Business from Nixon to NAFTA (Princeton University Press, 2014)
  • “Mobilizing for the Market: Organized Business, Wage-Price Controls, and the Politics of Inflation, 1971–1974,” Journal of American History (September 2013)
  • “The Corporate Mobilization Against Liberal Reform: Big Business Day, 1980,” in Julian Zelizer and Kim Phillips-Fein, eds., What’s Good for Business: Business and Politics Since World War II (Oxford University Press, 2012)
  • “O Futuro da Historia do Capitalismo,” [“The Future of the History of Capitalism”], Direito e Desenvolvimento: Revista do Curso de Direito, Centro Universitário de João Pessoa, UNIPÊ, João Pessoa, Paraiba, Brazil (August 2011)

Kathleen DuVal

July 20, 2017

Kathleen DuVal

466 Hamilton Hall
duval@email.unc.edu
919-962-5545
Curriculum Vitae
Personal Website


Research Interests:

Kathleen DuVal’s research focuses on early America, particularly cross-cultural relations on North American borderlands. She researches and writes about how various American Indian, European, and African men and women interacted from the sixteenth through early nineteenth centuries.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST/AMST 110 —Native North America
  • HIST 124 – U.S. History Through Film
  • HIST 127—History of the United States to 1865
  • HIST 355—American Women’s History to 1865
  • HIST 561—The American Colonial Experience
  • HIST 564—Revolution and Nation-Making in America, 1763-1815
  • HIST 691—Honors in History
  • HIST 692—Honors in History
  • HIST 831—Readings in Early American History

Notable Publications:

  • Independence Lost: Lives on the Edge of the American Revolution (Random House, 2015)
  • Interpreting a Continent: Voices from Colonial America, co-edited with John DuVal (Rowman & Littlefield, 2009)
  • The Native Ground: Indians and Colonists in the Heart of the Continent (Early American Studies Series, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2006)
  • “Indian Intermarriage and Métissage in Colonial Louisiana,” William and Mary Quarterly 65 (April 2008), 267–304
  • “Cross-Cultural Crime and Osage Justice in the Western Mississippi Valley,” Ethnohistory (Fall 2007), 697–722
  • “Debating Identity, Sovereignty, and Civilization: The Arkansas Valley after the Louisiana Purchase,” Journal of the Early Republic (Spring 2006), 25–59

Peter A. Coclanis

July 20, 2017

Peter A. Coclanis

419 Hamilton Hall
coclanis@unc.edu
919-843-6300
Curriculum Vitae


Research Interests:

Peter A. Coclanis is an economic historian who works on questions relating broadly to economic development in various parts of the world from the seventeenth century CE to the present. He has published widely in U.S. economic history, Southeast Asian economic history, and global economic history. He also writes frequently for newspapers and magazines on contemporary issues ranging from political economy to culture to sports.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

Notable Publications:

Claude Clegg

July 20, 2017

Claude Clegg

210 Battle Hall
cclegg@email.unc.edu

Curriculum Vitae


Research Interests:

Claude Clegg’s work focuses on the African diaspora of the Atlantic world, exploring the ways in which people of African descent have created and imagined communities and identities outside Africa. He teaches courses in African American history and U.S. history, with particular emphasis on the themes of migration, diaspora, nationalism, and social mobilization. He is currently working on a book tentatively entitled “A President and a People,” which examines the ways African Americans have experienced and interpreted the Obama presidency.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

Notable Publications:

  • An Original Man: The Life and Times of Elijah Muhammad (St. Martin’s Press, 1997; Reprinted by the University of North Carolina Press, 2014)
  • The Price of Liberty: African Americans and the Making of Liberia (University of North Carolina Press, 2004)
  • Troubled Ground: A Tale of Murder, Lynching, and Reckoning in the New South (University of Illinois Press, 2010)
  • Editor, Africa and the African American Imagination (ProQuest and Schomburg Studies of the Black Experience, 2007)

Emily Burrill

July 20, 2017

Emily Burrill

CB# 3135
eburrill@email.unc.edu
919-962-3371


Research Interests:

  • Gender History
  • African History
  • Former French Empire; Colonialism and Post-colonialism

Graduate Students:

There are no graduate students studying under this faculty member at this time.

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 535 – Women and Gender in African History

Notable Publications:

  • “Historicizing Social Justice and the Longue Durée of Forced Marriage in Africa,” in Marriage by Force?: Contestation Over Consent and Coercion in Africa, ed. Annie Bunting, et al. (Ohio University Press, 2016)
  • States of Marriage: Gender, Justice, and Rights in Colonial Mali (Ohio University Press, 2015)
  • Co-editor, Domestic Violence and the Law in Colonial and Postcolonial Africa (Ohio University Press, 2010)
  • “‘Wives of Circumstance’: Slave Emancipation, Vulnerability, and Gender in Late Nineteenth Century Senegal,” Slavery and Abolition 29 (1): 49-64
  • “Disputing Wife Abuse: Tribunal Narratives of the Corporeal Punishment of Wives in Colonial Sikasso, 1930s,” Cahiers d’Etudes Africaines 47 (3-4): 603-622

Kathryn J. Burns

July 20, 2017

Kathryn J. Burns

465 Hamilton Hall
kjburns@email.unc.edu
919-962-6618


Research Interests:

Kathryn Burns began phased retirement in July 2019. She works on colonial Latin America, especially the history of mestizaje, property, and literacy in the colonial Andes. Her first book examined nuns, production, and reproduction in Cuzco. Her second traces the practices of the Spanish American escribanos who shaped notarial truth and generated vast colonial archives.

Graduate Students:

Kathryn Burns is in phased retirement and is not accepting graduate students at this time.

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 142—Latin America Under Colonial Rule
  • HIST 143—Latin America Since Independence
  • HIST 280 (WMST 80)—Women and Gender in Latin American History
  • HIST 397—The History of Race in Latin America
  • HIST 713—Introductory Colloquium in Latin American History Before 1810
  • HIST 721—Readings in European Expansion and Global Interaction, 1400–1800
  • HIST 820—Gender and Power in Colonial Latin America

Notable Publications:

  • Into the Archive: Writing and Power in Colonial Peru (Duke University Press, 2010)
  • “Unfixing Race,” in Rereading the Black Legend: The Discourses of Religious and Racial Difference in the Renaissance Empires, eds. Margaret R. Greer, Walter D. Mignolo, and Maureen Quilligan (University of Chicago, 2007), 188–202
  • Colonial Habits: Convents and the Spiritual Economy of Cuzco, Peru (Duke University Press, 1999)
  • “Dentro de la ciudad letrada: La producción de la escritura pública en el Perú colonial,” Histórica [Lima, Peru] 29:1 (July 2005), 43–68
  • “Notaries, Truth, and Consequences,” American Historical Review 110:2 (April 2005), 350–379

Melissa M. Bullard

July 20, 2017

Melissa M. Bullard

458 Hamilton Hall
mbullard@email.unc.edu
919-962-5585


Research Interests:

Renaissance Italy, Early Modern Europe, and the Atlantic World are the foci of Melissa Bullard’s research. She has written books on political finance and the cultural and diplomatic world of Renaissance Italy as well as numerous articles dealing with patronage, family history, papal finance, diplomacy, psychology, and culture. She published two volumes for the internationally-sponsored critical edition with extensive historical commentary on the letters of Lorenzo de’ Medici. Reaching into the Atlantic World, in 2017 she published a book on Brooklyn’s Renaissance, a transatlantic study of the conjunction of commerce, culture, and community-building in the nineteenth-century. Her courses cover the Renaissance, medieval and early modern economic and cultural history, Mediterranean economies and societies, and a capstone seminar on Myth and History.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 151—European History to 1650
  • HIST 177H—Voices of the Italian Renaissance (Honors Seminar in Early European History)
  • HIST 178H—The Dismal Science (Honors Seminar in European History)
  • HIST 255—Manor to Machine: The Economic Shaping of Europe
  • HIST 391—Florence, Cradle of the Renaissance
  • HIST 452—The Renaissance
  • HIST 453—Mediterranean Societies and Economies in the Renaissance World
  • HIST 697—Myth and History
  • HIST 761—Readings in Early Modern European History

Notable Publications:

  • Brooklyn’s Renaissance: Commerce, Culture, and Community in the Nineteenth-Century Atlantic World (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017).
  • Lettere di Lorenzo de’ Medici, vols. X and XI (Istituto Nazionale di Studi sul Rinascimento and Guinti-Barbèra, 2003 and 2004)
  • Lorenzo the Magnificent: Image and Anxiety, Politics and Finance (Olschki, 1994)
  • Filippo Strozzi and the Medici: Favor and Finance in Sixteenth-Century Florence and Rome (Cambridge University Press, 1980; paperback edition, 2008)

Marcus Bull

July 20, 2017

Marcus Bull

471 Hamilton Hall
mgbull@email.unc.edu
919-962-5544
Curriculum Vitae


Research Interests:

Marcus Bull’s research focuses on the narratology of historical texts from the central medieval period to the sixteenth century, an interest that informs his most recent book: Eyewitness and Crusade Narrative: Perception and Narration in Accounts of the Second, Third and Fourth Crusades (Boydell; Woodbridge, 2018). He is currently engaged in two book projects: a study of the Great Siege of Malta in 1565, with particular reference to the ways in which its representations in word and image sought to capture what participants were believed to have experienced in person; and an exploration of experience, memory, the play of social scripts and self-construction in the memoirs of Pierre de Bourdeille, better known as Brantôme.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 89—History and Myth in Film
  • HIST 107—Introduction to Medieval History
  • HIST 108-Introduction to Early Medieval History
  • HIST 229-History of London 43-1666
  • HIST 398—Seeing the Past: Eyewitness and Autobiographical Narratives Since the Middle Ages
  • HIST 434—Medieval England
  • HIST 437—Aristocratic Culture in the Central Middle Ages
  • HIST 438—Medieval Masculinities
  • HIST 701—Introduction to Medieval Studies
  • HIST 890—Historiography and Narrative

Notable Publications:

  • Eyewitness and Crusade Narration: Perception and Narration in Accounts of the Second, Third and Fourth Crusades (Boydell; Woodbridge, 2018)
  • Co-editor, Writing the Early Crusades: Text, Transmission and Memory (Boydell; Woodbridge, 2014)
  • Co-editor, The Historia Iherosolimitana of Robert the Monk (Boydell; Woodbridge, 2013)
  • Co-editor, Tudorism: Historical Imagination and the Appropriation of the Sixteenth Century, Proceedings of the British Academy, 170, (Oxford University Press; Oxford, 2011)
  • Thinking Medieval: An Introduction to the Study of the Middle Ages (Palgrave Macmillan: Basingstoke, 2005)
  • Co-editor, The World of Eleanor of Aquitaine: Literature and Society in Southern France between the Eleventh and Thirteenth Centuries (Boydell; Woodbridge, 2005)
  • Co-editor, The Experience of Crusading: Western Approaches. Presented to Jonathan Riley-Smith on his 65th Birthday (Cambridge University Press; Cambridge, 2003)
  • Editor, France in the Central Middle Ages 900–1200, The Short Oxford History of France (Oxford University Press: Oxford, 2002)
  • The Miracles of Our Lady of Rocamadour: Analysis and Translation (Boydell; Woodbridge, 1999)
  • Knightly Piety and the Lay Response to the First Crusade: The Limousin and Gascony c.970–c.1130 (Oxford University Press; Oxford, 1993)