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Benjamin Waterhouse

August 1, 2017

Benjamin Waterhouse

473 Hamilton Hall
waterhou@email.unc.edu
919-962-2373
Curriculum Vitae


Research Interests:

Benjamin Waterhouse studies American politics, political culture, and capitalism in the twentieth century. He is interested in contests between economic groups, including business, labor, and the political class, and how the relationships among them shaped the broader contours of the American political tradition and American economic development. Waterhouse teaches courses on the history of business and economics, politics and political thought, and capitalism. His first book, Lobbying America: The Politics of Business from Nixon to NAFTA (Princeton University Press, 2014) explores the role that large, national business associations—and their lobbyists—played in shaping economic policy and conservative politics between the 1960s and the 1990s.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 89-FYS: America in the 1970s
  • HIST 364- The History of American Business
  • HIST 372 – Politics and Society Since the New Deal
  • HIST 398- American Political History in the Twentieth Century (undergraduate research seminar)
  • HIST 716- Graduate Colloquium in American History Since 1865
  • HIST 890 – American Economic History and the History of Capitalism
  • HNRS 353 – The History of the 2008 Financial Crisis

Notable Publications:

  • The Land of Enterprise: A Business History of the United States (Simon & Schuster, 2017)
  • Lobbying America: The Politics of Business from Nixon to NAFTA (Princeton University Press, 2014)
  • “Mobilizing for the Market: Organized Business, Wage-Price Controls, and the Politics of Inflation, 1971–1974,” Journal of American History (September 2013)
  • “The Corporate Mobilization Against Liberal Reform: Big Business Day, 1980,” in Julian Zelizer and Kim Phillips-Fein, eds., What’s Good for Business: Business and Politics Since World War II (Oxford University Press, 2012)
  • “O Futuro da Historia do Capitalismo,” [“The Future of the History of Capitalism”], Direito e Desenvolvimento: Revista do Curso de Direito, Centro Universitário de João Pessoa, UNIPÊ, João Pessoa, Paraiba, Brazil (August 2011)

Kathleen DuVal

July 20, 2017

Kathleen DuVal

466 Pauli Murray Hall
duval@email.unc.edu
919-962-5545
Curriculum Vitae
Personal Website


Research Interests:

Kathleen DuVal’s research focuses on early America, particularly how various Native American, European, and African women and men interacted from the sixteenth through early nineteenth centuries.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST/AMST 110—Native North America
  • HIST 124–U.S. History Through Film
  • HIST 127—History of the United States to 1865
  • HIST 355—American Women’s History to 1865
  • HIST 237—The American Colonial Experience (previously HIST 561)
  • HIST 238—Revolution and Nation-Making in America, 1763-1815 (previously HIST 564)
  • HIST 691—Honors in History
  • HIST 692—Honors in History
  • HIST 726—Readings in Early American History

Notable Publications:

  • Independence Lost: Lives on the Edge of the American Revolution (Random House, 2015)
  • Interpreting a Continent: Voices from Colonial America, co-edited with John DuVal (Rowman & Littlefield, 2009)
  • The Native Ground: Indians and Colonists in the Heart of the Continent (Early American Studies Series, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2006)
  • “Indian Intermarriage and Métissage in Colonial Louisiana,” William and Mary Quarterly 65 (April 2008), 267–304
  • “Cross-Cultural Crime and Osage Justice in the Western Mississippi Valley,” Ethnohistory (Fall 2007), 697–722
  • “Debating Identity, Sovereignty, and Civilization: The Arkansas Valley after the Louisiana Purchase,” Journal of the Early Republic (Spring 2006), 25–59

Peter A. Coclanis

July 20, 2017

Peter A. Coclanis

419 Hamilton Hall
coclanis@unc.edu
919-843-6300
Curriculum Vitae


Research Interests:

Peter A. Coclanis is an economic historian who works on questions relating broadly to economic development in various parts of the world from the seventeenth century CE to the present. He has published widely in U.S. economic history, Southeast Asian economic history, and global economic history. He also writes frequently for newspapers and magazines on contemporary issues ranging from political economy to culture to sports.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

Notable Publications:

Claude A. Clegg III

July 20, 2017

Claude A. Clegg III

210 Battle Hall
cclegg@email.unc.edu
919-962-2347
Curriculum Vitae
Personal Website


Research Interests:

Claude Clegg holds a joint appointment in the Department of History and the Department of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies. His research and teaching focus on African American history, US and southern history, social movements, and the US presidency. Professor Clegg has been featured in media outlets such as NPR’s “To the Best of Our Knowledge” and C-SPAN’s “Cities Tour,” and his books have been reviewed in the New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Journal of American History, and other venues. Professor Clegg recently completed a book on the Obama presidency and is currently writing a biography of Marcus Garvey.

Graduate Students:

Alexandra Odom

Courses Offered:

HIST 244: History of the American Presidency
AAAD 257: Black Nationalism in the United States
AAAD 130: Introduction to African American & Diaspora Studies

Notable Publications:

  • The Black President: Hope and Fury in the Age of Obama (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2021).
  • The Life and Times of Elijah Muhammad (1997; reprint, Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina, 2014)
  • The Price of Liberty: African Americans and the Making of Liberia (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2004)
  • Troubled Ground: A Tale of Murder, Lynching, and Reckoning in the New South (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2010)
  • Editor. Africa and the African American Imagination (ProQuest and Schomburg Studies of the Black Experience, 2007)
  • Marcus Bull

    July 20, 2017

    Marcus Bull

    471 Hamilton Hall
    mgbull@email.unc.edu
    919-962-5544
    Curriculum Vitae


    Research Interests:

    Marcus Bull’s research focuses on the narratology of historical texts from the central medieval period to the sixteenth century, an interest that informs his most recent book: Eyewitness and Crusade Narrative: Perception and Narration in Accounts of the Second, Third and Fourth Crusades (Boydell; Woodbridge, 2018). He is currently engaged in two book projects: a study of the Great Siege of Malta in 1565, with particular reference to the ways in which its representations in word and image sought to capture what participants were believed to have experienced in person; and an exploration of experience, memory, the play of social scripts and self-construction in the memoirs of Pierre de Bourdeille, better known as Brantôme.

    Graduate Students:

    Courses Offered:

    • HIST 89—History and Myth in Film
    • HIST 107—Introduction to Medieval History
    • HIST 108-Introduction to Early Medieval History
    • HIST 229-History of London 43-1666
    • HIST 398—Seeing the Past: Eyewitness and Autobiographical Narratives Since the Middle Ages
    • HIST 434—Medieval England
    • HIST 437—Aristocratic Culture in the Central Middle Ages
    • HIST 438—Medieval Masculinities
    • HIST 701—Introduction to Medieval Studies
    • HIST 890—Historiography and Narrative

    Notable Publications:

    • Eyewitness and Crusade Narration: Perception and Narration in Accounts of the Second, Third and Fourth Crusades (Boydell; Woodbridge, 2018)
    • Co-editor, Writing the Early Crusades: Text, Transmission and Memory (Boydell; Woodbridge, 2014)
    • Co-editor, The Historia Iherosolimitana of Robert the Monk (Boydell; Woodbridge, 2013)
    • Co-editor, Tudorism: Historical Imagination and the Appropriation of the Sixteenth Century, Proceedings of the British Academy, 170, (Oxford University Press; Oxford, 2011)
    • Thinking Medieval: An Introduction to the Study of the Middle Ages (Palgrave Macmillan: Basingstoke, 2005)
    • Co-editor, The World of Eleanor of Aquitaine: Literature and Society in Southern France between the Eleventh and Thirteenth Centuries (Boydell; Woodbridge, 2005)
    • Co-editor, The Experience of Crusading: Western Approaches. Presented to Jonathan Riley-Smith on his 65th Birthday (Cambridge University Press; Cambridge, 2003)
    • Editor, France in the Central Middle Ages 900–1200, The Short Oxford History of France (Oxford University Press: Oxford, 2002)
    • The Miracles of Our Lady of Rocamadour: Analysis and Translation (Boydell; Woodbridge, 1999)
    • Knightly Piety and the Lay Response to the First Crusade: The Limousin and Gascony c.970–c.1130 (Oxford University Press; Oxford, 1993)

    Chad Bryant

    July 20, 2017

    Chad Bryant

    468 Hamilton Hall
    bryantc@email.unc.edu

    Curriculum Vitae


    Research Interests:

    Chad Bryant’s interests include nationalism and the urban experience in modern Central and Eastern Europe, with a particular focus on the lands of today’s Czech Republic. His most recent book focuses on the capital city of Prague and questions of belonging in the modern era. He is, with Kateřina Čapková and Diana Dumitru, embarking on a study of the Stalinist-era show trials in Czechoslovakia.

    Graduate Students:

    Courses Offered:

  • HIST 101 — A History of Lies, Conspiracies, and Misinformation
  • HIST 140—The World Since 1945
  • HIST 260 – From Kings to Communists: East-Central Europe in the Modern Era
  • HNRS 353 – Magic Prague? Biographies of a Central European City
  • HIST 398 – Boom Cities: Urban Histories of a Modernizing Age, 1870-1914
  • HIST 783—An Introduction to Russian and East European History
  • HIST 784—Readings in East European History
  • Notable Publications:

    • Prague: Belonging and the Modern City (Harvard University Press, 2021)
    • Co-editor, with Arthur Burns and Paul Readman, Walking Histories, 1800-1914 (Palgrave, 2016)
    • Co-editor, with Paul Readman and Cynthia Radding, Borderlands in World History, 1700-1914 (Palgrave, 2014)
    • Prague in Black: Nazi Rule and Czech Nationalism (Harvard University Press, 2007)
    • “Habsburg History, Eastern European History… Central European History?” Central European History 51:1 (2018): 1-15
    • “War as Revolution of the Self: The Diaries of Vojtěch Berger” Střed/Centre 8:2 (2016): 9-34
    • “Zap’s Prague: The City, the Nation, and Czech Elites before 1848,” Urban History 40, 2 (May 2013): 181-201

    W. Fitzhugh Brundage

    July 20, 2017

    W. Fitzhugh Brundage

    511 Hamilton Hall
    brundage@email.unc.edu
    919-962-7533
    Curriculum Vitae
    Personal Website


    Research Interests:

    W. Fitzhugh Brundage’s general research interests are American history since the Civil War, with a particular focus on the American South. He has written on lynching, utopian socialism in the New South, white and black historical memory in the South since the Civil War, and the history of torture in the United States from the time of European contact to the twenty-first century. His current research project is a study of Civil War prisoner of war camps.

    Graduate Students:

    Courses Offered:

    • HIST 114—American History and Film
    • HIST 125—The Social History of Popular Music in Twentieth Century America

    Notable Publications:

    • Civilizing Torture: An American Tradition (Belknap Press, 2018)
    • Editor, Beyond Blackface: African Americans and the Creation of American Popular Culture, 1890-1930 (University of North Carolina Press, 2011)(
    • The Southern Past: A Clash of Race and Memory (Harvard University Press, 2008)
    • Editor, Where These Memories Grow: History, Memory, and Regional Identity in the American South (University of North Carolina Press, 2000)
    • A Socialist Utopia: The Ruskin Colonies in Tennessee and Georgia, 1894-1901 (University of Illinois Press, 1996)
  • Lynching in the New South: Georgia and Virginia, 1880-1930 (University of Illinois Press, 1993)
  • William L. Barney

    July 20, 2017

    William L. Barney

    462 Hamilton Hall
    wbarney@email.unc.edu
    919-962-5584


    Research Interests:

    Professor Barney’s research focuses on the nineteenth-century U.S., especially the antebellum South. He is currently researching a book on the cultural and economic politics of secession.

    Graduate Students:

    Courses Offered:

    • HIST 127—United States History to 1865
    • HIST 128—United States History Since 1865
    • HIST 565—Civil War and Reconstruction, 1848–1877
    • HIST 834—The Middle Period, 1815–1860
    • HIST 840—Civil War and Reconstruction, 1860–1876

    Notable Publications:

    • The Civil War and Reconstruction: A Student Companion (Oxford University Press, 2001)
    • Battleground for the Union: The Era of the Civil War and Reconstruction, 1848–1877 (Prentice Hall, Inc., 1990)
    • Passage of the Republic: An Interdisciplinary History of Nineteenth Century America (D.C. Heath, 1987)
    • The Secessionist Impulse: Alabama and Mississippi in 1860 (Princeton University Press, 1974)
    • Flawed Victory: New Perspective on the Civil War (Rowman & Littlefield, 1975)
    • The Road to Secession: A New Perspective on the Old South (Praeger, 1972)

    Cemil Aydin

    July 20, 2017

    Cemil Aydin

    424 Hamilton Hall
    caydin@email.unc.edu

    Curriculum Vitae


    Research Interests:

    Cemil Aydin’s interests focus on both Modern Middle Eastern History and Modern Asian history, with an emphasis on the international and intellectual histories of the Ottoman and Japanese Empires. He is particularly interested in historical processes that shape transnational racial and civilizational identities, such as Muslim, Asian, African. His research and publications offer new ways to understand the historical roots of the contemporary world order by describing the process of imperial era conflicts and decolonization, especially from the perspective of non-Western actors of the Muslim world and East Asia. Other research and teaching interests deal with questions of internationalism and orientalism, and modern world history.

    Graduate Students:

    Courses Offered:

    • HIST 394—International and Global History
    • HIST 460—Empires, Nations and Revolutions, 1750–1919

    Notable Publications:

  • Cemil Aydin, The Idea of the Muslim World: A Global Intellectual History (Harvard University Press, March 2017) –Italian translation:, L’idea di mondo musulmano. Una storia intellettuale globale (Einaudi Publishers, 2018)
  • Cemil Aydin and Juliane Hammer, “Muslims and Media: Perceptions, Participation, and Change” (special issue), Contemporary Islam (10 December 2009)
  • Cemil Aydin, The Politics of Anti-Westernism in Asia: Visions of World Order in Pan-Islamic and Pan-Asian Thought (New York: Columbia University Press, Global and International History Series, 2007)
  • Cemil Aydin and Juliane Hammer, “Critiques of the ‘West’ in Turkey, Iran and Japan: Occidentalism, the Crisis of Global Modernity and the Politics of Nationalism,” special issue of Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East 26:3 (Fall 2006). (Editor’s Introduction: 347-352)
  • Karen Auerbach

    July 20, 2017

    Karen Auerbach

    412 Hamilton Hall
    kauerbach@unc.edu

    Curriculum Vitae


    Research Interests:

    Professor Auerbach’s research focuses on the social history of Polish Jews in the nineteenth and twentieth century, especially issues relating to Jewish integration, urban life, and the evolution of Polish Jewish identifications. Her first book, published in 2013, is a microhistory of Jewish families who were neighbors in an apartment building in Warsaw after the Holocaust, exploring the reconstruction of communities and identifications in postwar Poland. She is currently researching the history of Jewish publishers of Polish books in the nineteenth and early twentieth century, in particular their involvement in Polish cultural, social and political circles, as well as information networks and the history of Yiddish in Eastern Europe during the Holocaust. Auerbach’s teaching focuses on modern Jewish history, East European Jewish History and the Holocaust.

    Graduate Students:

    Courses Offered:

    • HIST 190—The Search for Modern Jewish Identity
    • HNRS 353—Ghettos and Shtetls? Urban Life in East European Jewish History
    • HIST 485—Modern East European Jewish History and Culture
    • HIST 262—History of the Holocaust: The Destruction of the European Jews

    Notable Publications:

    • The House at Ujazdowskie 16: Jewish Families in Warsaw after the Holocaust (Indiana University Press, 2013)
    • “Memory of the Holocaust in Recent Polish Historiography.” Association for Jewish Studies Review 35.1. April 2011
    • “Insiders-Outsiders: Poles and Jews in Recent Polish-Jewish Fiction and Autobiography.” Co-author with Antony Polonsky. in Insiders and Outsiders: Dilemmas of East European Jewry, edited by Richard Cohen, Jonathan Frankel and Stefani Hoffman, 2010