Skip to main content

Miguel La Serna

August 3, 2017

Miguel La Serna

566 Hamilton Hall
laserna@email.unc.edu



Research Interests:

Miguel La Serna is interested in the relationship between culture, memory, and political violence in twentieth-century Latin America. He has published numerous studies on the political violence of late-20th century Peru, and is currently working on a project that puts Andean insurgencies in global perspective.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 51—Ideology and Revolution in Latin America
  • HIST 142–Latin America Under Colonial Rule
  • HIST 143–Latin America Since Independence
  • HIST 145–Latin American Indigenous Peoples
  • HIST 242—U.S.-Latin American Relations
  • HIST 248–U.S.-Latin American Relations
  • HIST 280–Women and Gender in Latin America
  • HIST 398—The Life and Times of Che Guevara
  • HIST 714–Colloquium in the History of Latin America since 1810
  • HIST 742–History and Memory
  • HIST 820–Problems in Latin America: Latin America in the Cold War

Notable Publications:

  • With Masses and Arms: Peru’s Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2020.
  • The Shining Path: Love, Madness and Revolution in the Andes (co-authored with Orin Starn). New York: WW Norton & Company, 2019.
  • The Corner of the Living: Ayacucho on the Eve of the Shining Path Insurgency Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2012.
  • “Murió comiendo rata: Power Relations in Pre-Sendero Ayacucho, Peru, 1940–1983,” A Contracorriente Vol. 9 Issue 2 (Winter 2012), 1–34
  • “To Cross the River of Blood: How an Inter-Community Conflict is Linked to the Peruvian Civil War, 1940–1983,” in Power, Culture, and Violence in the Andes, eds. Christine Hunefeldt and Milos Kokotovic (Sussex Academic Press, 2009)

Lloyd S. Kramer

August 3, 2017

Lloyd S. Kramer

455 Hamilton Hall
lkramer@unc.edu
919-962-5553
Curriculum Vitae


Research Interests:

Lloyd Kramer’s interests focus on Modern European History with an emphasis on nineteenth-century France. He is particularly interested in historical processes that shape cultural identities, including the experiences of cross-cultural exchange and the emergence of modern nationalism. Other research and teaching interests deal with the roles of intellectuals in modern societies and the theoretical foundations of historical knowledge. His teaching stresses the importance of reading, discussing, and writing about influential books in various eras of European history and world history. One recurring theme in all of his research and teaching stresses the importance of cross-cultural exchanges in modern world history.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 53—Traveling to European Cities: American Writers and Cultural Identities, 1830-2000.
  • HIST 151—European History to 1650
  • HIST 391—The Age of the Atlantic Revolutions
  • HIST 466—Modern European Intellectual History
  • HIST 772—Readings in the Intellectual History of Europe

Notable Publications:

  • Co-author, with R. R. Palmer and Joel Colton, of A History of Europe in the Modern World, 12th edition (McGraw-Hill, 2020)
  • Nationalism in Europe and America: Politics, Cultures, and Identities Since 1775 (UNC Press, 2011)
  • Lafayette in Two Worlds: Public Cultures and Personal Identities in an Age of Revolutions (UNC Press, 1996)
  • Co-editor, Learning History in America: Schools, Cultures and Politics (University of Minnesota Press, 1994)
  • Threshold of a New World: Intellectuals and the Exile Experience in Paris, 1830–1848 (Cornell University Press, 1988)

Michelle King

August 3, 2017

Michelle King

475 Hamilton Hall
mtking@email.unc.edu

Curriculum Vitae


Research Interests:

Michelle T. King specializes in modern Chinese gender history and food history. She was recently awarded a 2020-21 National Endowment for the Humanities Public Scholars grant for her book project on Taiwan’s beloved postwar television cooking celebrity, Fu Pei-mei (1931-2004). She has also received major fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies, the Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation, and the University of Texas at Austin Institute for Historical Studies. Her article on Margaret Sanger’s 1922 lecture trip to China won the Journal of Women’s History Biennial Best Article Prize for 2017-18.

King recently edited Culinary Nationalism in Asia (Bloomsbury Academic, 2019), a collection of comparative studies of culinary nationalism in East, Southeast, and South Asia, and a special issue of Global Food History (Summer 2020) on culinary regionalism in China. Her first book, Between Birth and Death: Female Infanticide in Nineteenth-Century China (Stanford University Press, 2014), placed cross-cultural critiques of female infanticide in China in critical perspective. Her work has appeared in Food and Foodways, Global Food History, Gastronomica, Journal of Women’s History, Social History, and other publications.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 285—Twentieth-Century China
  • HIST 284—Late Imperial China
  • HIST 550—Gender in Chinese History
  • HNRS 353—The Cultural History of Food in China
  • HIST 398—China Bound: Western Travel Writing on China

Notable Publications:

  • “Say No to Bat Fried Rice: Changing the Narrative of Coronavirus and Chinese Food,” in Food and Foodways 28.3 (Fall 2020), 237-49
  • “What is ‘Chinese’ Food? Historicizing the Concept of Culinary Regionalism,” in Global Food History 6.2 (Summer 2020), pp. 89-109
  • Editor, Culinary Nationalism in Asia (Bloomsbury Academic, 2019)
  • “The Julia Child of Chinese Cooking, or the Fu Pei-mei of French Food?: Comparative Contexts of Female Culinary Celebrity,” in Gastronomica 18.1 (February 2018), pp. 15-26
  • “Margaret Sanger in Translation: Gender, Class and Birth Control in 1920s China” in Journal of Women’s History 29.3 (Fall 2017), pp. 61-83
  • Between Birth and Death: Female Infanticide in Nineteenth-Century China (Stanford University Press, 2014)
  • “Working With/In the Archive,” in Research Methods for History, ed. Simon Gunn and Lucy Faire (Edinburgh University Press, 2012), 13–29
  • “Replicating the Colonial Expert: The Problem of Translation in the Late Nineteenth-Century Straits Settlements” in Social History 34.4 (November 2009), 428–46

Lauren Jarvis

August 3, 2017

Lauren Jarvis

Hamilton Hall
ljarvis@email.unc.edu

Curriculum Vitae


Research Interests:

Lauren Jarvis’s research focuses on the history of religion in sub-Saharan Africa, with an emphasis on twentieth-century South Africa. She is currently completing a book on the Nazaretha Church, one of the oldest and largest of the many faith healing churches that took root in southern Africa in the twentieth century. Jarvis sees religious history as a window into the ideas that matter in people’s daily lives, and her book examines the ways that involvement in new religious communities changed how people thought about the future. It is a history of collective hopes, dreams, and ambitions. Jarvis is also in the early stages of a second book-length project, which explores how Africans in southern Africa used the Bible to construct—and argue about—racial identities.

Graduate Students:

  • Laura Cox
  • Kaela Thuney (Co-advised with Lisa A. Lindsay)
  • Courses Offered:

    • HIST 130 – Twentieth Century Africa
    • HIST 279 – Modern South Africa
    • HIST 534 – African Diaspora

    Notable Publications:

    • “A Chief is a Chief by the Women? The Nazaretha Church, Gender, and Traditional Authority in Mtunzini, South Africa, 1900-1948” Journal of African History 56:1 (2015).
    • “Gender, Violence, and Home in the Nazareth Baptist Church, 1906-1939” in Ekhaya: The Politics of Home in KwaZulu-Natal, eds. Meghan Elisabeth Healy and Jason Hickel (University of KwaZulu-Natal Press, 2014)

    Konrad H. Jarausch

    August 3, 2017

    Konrad H. Jarausch

    502 Hamilton Hall
    jarausch@email.unc.edu
    919-962-8083
    Curriculum Vitae


    Research Interests:

    Konrad H. Jarausch has written or edited about forty books in modern German and European history. Starting with Hitler’s seizure of power and the First World War, his research interests have moved to the social history of German students and professions German unification in 1989/90, with historiography under the Communist GDR, the nature of the East German dictatorship, as well as the debate about historians and the Third Reich. More recently, he has been concerned with the problem of interpreting twentieth-century German history in general, the learning processes after 1945, the issue of cultural democratization, and the relationship between Honecker and Breshnew.

    Graduate Students:

    Courses Offered:

    • HIST 159—Twentieth-Century Europe
    • HIST 462—Germany, 1815–1918
    • HIST 469—European Social History, 1815–1970
    • HIST 771—Readings in Nineteenth-Century European History
    • HIST 746—History and the Social Sciences
    • HIST 924—Seminar in Modern European History

    Notable Publications:

    • Out of Ashes: A New History of Europe in the Twentieth Century (Princeton University Press, 2015), 880 pp.
    • Reluctant Accomplice: A Wehrmacht Soldier’s Letters from the Eastern Front (Princeton University Press, 2011)
    • “Das stille Sterben…”: Feldpostbriefe von Konrad Jarausch aus Polen und Russland (Paderborn: Schöningh, 2008)
    • Gebrochene Wissenschaftskulturen : Universität und Politik im 20. Jahrhundert (Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2010)
    • Shattered Past: Reconstructing German Histories (Princeton University Press, 2002)

    Karen Hagemann

    August 3, 2017

    Karen Hagemann

    562 Hamilton Hall
    hagemann@unc.edu

    Curriculum Vitae
    Personal Website


    Research Interests:

    Karen Hagemann teaches Modern German and European history, military history and women’s and gender history from the late eighteenth to the late twentieth century. Her most recent monograph Revisiting Prussia’s Wars against Napoleon: History, Culture, and Memory was published with Cambridge University Press in 2015 and won the Hans Rosenberg Prize for the best book in Central European History in 2016 by the Central European History Society. A German edition titled Umkämpftes Gedächtnis: Die Antinapoleonischen Kriege in der deutschen Erinnerung was published in 2019 with Schöningh. The volume Gendering Post-1945 German History: Entanglements, coedited with Donna Harsch and Friederike Brühöfener, was published by Berghahn Books in the spring 2019. The Oxford Handbook of Gender, War, and the Western World since 1600, coedited with Stefan Dudink and Sonya O. Rose, was published by Oxford University Press in the fall 2020 and won the Society for Military History’s Distinguished Book Award for Reference Work. Currently she is working on a monograph titled Forgotten Soldiers: Women, the Military and War in European History, 1600-2000 to be published in German and English.

    Graduate Students:

    Courses Offered:

    • HIST 072-001—First Year Seminar: Women’s Voices: 20th Century European History in the Female Memory
    • HIST/EURO 252—Politics, Society and Culture in Modern Germany (1871–1945)
    • HIST/WMST 259—Towards Emancipation? Women in Modern Europe
    • HIST/PWAD 354—War and Gender in Movies
    • HIST 398—Nazi Germany and the Holocaust in Female Experience and Memory
    • HIST/WMST 500—Gender, Race and Nation in Europe and Beyond, 18th-20th C.
    • HIST/PWAD/WMST 517—Gender, Military, and War in Comparative Perspective
    • HIST/WMST 725—Comparative/Global Gender History: Gender History and the History of Masculinity in Comparative and Global Perspective
    • HIST/WMST 730— Feminist and Gender Theory for Historians
    • HIST 742—History and Memory: An Introduction into Theory, Methodology, and Research
    • HIST/WMST 770— Readings in European Women’s and Gender History

    Notable Publications:

    Joseph T. Glatthaar

    August 3, 2017

    Joseph T. Glatthaar

    504 Hamilton Hall
    jtg@email.unc.edu


    Personal Website


    Research Interests:

    Joseph Glatthaar specializes and teaches courses in the American Civil War and American military history on the undergraduate and graduate levels.

    Graduate Students:

    Courses Offered:

    HIST 127 – American to 1865
    HIST 368 – War and American Society to 1903
    HIST 369 – War and American Society, 1903 to Present

    Notable Publications:

    • American Military History: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press, 2020)
    • Soldiering in the Army of Northern Virginia: A Statistical Portrait of the Troops Who Served under Robert E. Lee (UNC Press, 2011)
    • General Lee’s Army: From Victory to Collapse (New York: The Free Press, 2008)
    • Forgotten Allies: The Oneida Indians in the American Revolution, with James Kirby Martin (New York: Hill & Wang, 2006)
    • The Civil War in the West, 1863–1865 (Oxford: Osprey Publishing Co., 2001)
    • Partners in Command: Relationships Between Civil War Leaders (New York: The Free Press, 1994; Paperback edition The Free Press, 1996)
    • Forged in Battle: The Civil War Alliance of Black Soldiers and White Officers (New York: The Free Press, 1990; Paperback edition by Meridian, 1991; Paperback edition Louisiana State University Press, 1998)

    Lisa A. Lindsay

    August 1, 2017

    Lisa A. Lindsay

    560 Pauli Murray [Hamilton] Hall
    lalindsa@email.unc.edu
    919-962-2178
    Curriculum Vitae


    Research Interests:

    Lisa Lindsay’s research centers on the social history of West Africa, particularly Nigeria, and on links between Africa and other parts of the world. Focusing on gender, labor, slavery, migration, and biography, she endeavors to understand large-scale processes through human-scale experiences and to attend to African particularities as well as points of larger comparison and connection. Her most recent book, Atlantic Bonds, is the contextualized biography of a South Carolina freedman who in the 1850s migrated to modern-day Nigeria, making trans-Atlantic connections that his descendants and their American relatives maintain to this day. It won the African Studies Association’s prize for the best book published that year in any field of African studies. Her current research concerns women and gender in the Atlantic slave trade, especially from the Bight of Benin. Professor Lindsay’s research has been supported by fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, the National Humanities Center, and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

    Graduate Students:

  • Kaela Thuney (Co-advised with Lauren Jarvis)
  • Courses Offered:

    Notable Publications:

    • Atlantic Bonds: A Nineteenth Century Odyssey from America to Africa (UNC Press, 2017)
    • “Biography in African History,” History in Africa 44 (2017): 11-26
    • “The Autobiography of Jacob Von Brunn, from African Captive to Liberian Missionary,” Slavery and Abolition 37, 2 (2016): 446- 471
    • “Extraversion, Creolization, and Dependency in the Atlantic Slave Trade,” Journal of African History 55, 2 (2014): 135-145
    • Biography and the Black Atlantic, co-edited with John Wood Sweet (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013)
    • Captives as Commodities: The Transatlantic Slave Trade (Prentice Hall, 2008)
    • Working with Gender: Wage Labor and Social Change in Southwestern Nigeria (Heinemann, 2003)
    • Men and Masculinities in Modern Africa, co-edited with Stephan Miescher (Heinemann, 2003)

    Benjamin Waterhouse

    August 1, 2017

    Benjamin Waterhouse

    473 Hamilton Hall
    waterhou@email.unc.edu

    Curriculum Vitae


    Research Interests:

    Benjamin Waterhouse studies American politics, political culture, and capitalism in the twentieth century. He is interested in contests between economic groups, including business, labor, and the political class, and how the relationships among them shaped the broader contours of the American political tradition and American economic development. Waterhouse teaches courses on the history of business and economics, politics and political thought, and capitalism. His first book, Lobbying America: The Politics of Business from Nixon to NAFTA (Princeton University Press, 2014) explores the role that large, national business associations—and their lobbyists—played in shaping economic policy and conservative politics between the 1960s and the 1990s.

    Graduate Students:

    Courses Offered:

    • HIST 89-FYS: America in the 1970s
    • HIST 364- The History of American Business
    • HIST 372 – Politics and Society Since the New Deal
    • HIST 398- American Political History in the Twentieth Century (undergraduate research seminar)
    • HIST 716- Graduate Colloquium in American History Since 1865
    • HIST 890 – American Economic History and the History of Capitalism
    • HNRS 353 – The History of the 2008 Financial Crisis

    Notable Publications:

    • The Land of Enterprise: A Business History of the United States (Simon & Schuster, 2017)
    • Lobbying America: The Politics of Business from Nixon to NAFTA (Princeton University Press, 2014)
    • “Mobilizing for the Market: Organized Business, Wage-Price Controls, and the Politics of Inflation, 1971–1974,” Journal of American History (September 2013)
    • “The Corporate Mobilization Against Liberal Reform: Big Business Day, 1980,” in Julian Zelizer and Kim Phillips-Fein, eds., What’s Good for Business: Business and Politics Since World War II (Oxford University Press, 2012)
    • “O Futuro da Historia do Capitalismo,” [“The Future of the History of Capitalism”], Direito e Desenvolvimento: Revista do Curso de Direito, Centro Universitário de João Pessoa, UNIPÊ, João Pessoa, Paraiba, Brazil (August 2011)

    Kathleen DuVal

    July 20, 2017

    Kathleen DuVal

    466 Pauli Murray Hall
    duval@email.unc.edu

    Curriculum Vitae
    Personal Website


    Research Interests:

    Kathleen DuVal’s research focuses on early America, particularly how various Native American, European, and African women and men interacted from the sixteenth through early nineteenth centuries.

    Graduate Students:

    Courses Offered:

    • HIST/AMST 110—Native North America
    • HIST 124–U.S. History Through Film
    • HIST 127—History of the United States to 1865
    • HIST 355—American Women’s History to 1865
    • HIST 237—The American Colonial Experience (previously HIST 561)
    • HIST 238—Revolution and Nation-Making in America, 1763-1815 (previously HIST 564)
    • HIST 691—Honors in History
    • HIST 692—Honors in History
    • HIST 726—Readings in Early American History

    Notable Publications:

    • Independence Lost: Lives on the Edge of the American Revolution (Random House, 2015)
    • Interpreting a Continent: Voices from Colonial America, co-edited with John DuVal (Rowman & Littlefield, 2009)
    • The Native Ground: Indians and Colonists in the Heart of the Continent (Early American Studies Series, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2006)
    • “Indian Intermarriage and Métissage in Colonial Louisiana,” William and Mary Quarterly 65 (April 2008), 267–304
    • “Cross-Cultural Crime and Osage Justice in the Western Mississippi Valley,” Ethnohistory (Fall 2007), 697–722
    • “Debating Identity, Sovereignty, and Civilization: The Arkansas Valley after the Louisiana Purchase,” Journal of the Early Republic (Spring 2006), 25–59