James L. Leloudis

August 3, 2017

James L. Leloudis

518 Hamilton Hall
leloudis@email.unc.edu
919-843-7754
Curriculum Vitae


Research Interests:

James Leloudis’s chief interest is the history of the modern South, with emphases on labor, education, race, and reform. He and Robert Korstad of Duke University are currently working on a history of voting rights and a research and civic engagement project on “The Moral Challenges of Poverty and the Ethics of Service.”

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 366—North Carolina History Before 1865
  • HIST 367—North Carolina History Since 1865
  • HIST 587—The South Since Reconstruction
  • HIST 841—Readings in the South Since Reconstruction

Notable Publications:

  • To Right These Wrongs: The North Carolina Fund and the Battle to End Poverty and Injustice in 1960s America, with Robert Korstad (University of North Carolina Press, 2010)
  • North Carolina (Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 2003)
  • Schooling the New South: Pedagogy, Self, and Society in North Carolina, 1880–1920 (University of North Carolina Press, 1996)
  • Like a Family: The Making of a Southern Cotton Mill World, with Jacquelyn Dowd Hall, Robert Korstad, Mary Murphy, Lu Ann Jones, and Christopher B. Daly (University of North Carolina Press, 1987 and 2000; W. W. Norton, 1989)

Wayne E. Lee

August 3, 2017

Wayne E. Lee

400 Hamilton Hall
wlee@unc.edu
919-962-3973

Personal Website


Research Interests:

Wayne Lee specializes in early modern military history, with a particular focus on North America and the Atlantic World, but he teaches military history from a full global perspective at the undergraduate and graduate level. He also teaches courses on violence as well as on the early English exploration of the Atlantic. As a kind of additional career, he works with archaeology projects, and recently published his work (listed below) from a project in the mountains of northern Albania. He is now working on a new project in southern Greece. For more details on Professor Lee’s research see the link to his web page below.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 292H—Early English Exploration and Colonization
  • HIST 351—Global History of Warfare
  • PWAD 350—National and International Security

Notable Publications:

  • Waging War: Conflict, Culture, and Innovation in World History (New York: Oxford University Press, 2015).
  • Editor, with Michael Galaty, Ols Lafe, and Zamir Tafilica, Light and Shadow: Isolation and Interaction in the Shala Valley of Northern Albania (Los Angeles: Cotsen Institute of Archaeology Press, 2013)
  • Barbarians and Brothers: Anglo-American Warfare, 1500-1865 (Oxford University Press, 2011).
  • Editor, Warfare and Culture in World History (NYU Press, 2011)
  • Crowds and Soldiers in Revolutionary North Carolina: The Culture of Violence in Riot and War (University Press of Florida, 2001)
  • “Fortify, Fight, or Flee: Tuscarora and Cherokee Defensive Warfare and Military Culture Adaptation,” Journal of Military History 68 (2004): 713–770

Klaus W. Larres

August 3, 2017

Klaus W. Larres

416 Hamilton Hall
larres@unc.edu
919-962-8079

Personal Website


Research Interests:

Klaus Larres is an expert on contemporary U.S. and German/EU foreign, economic, and security policies toward the transatlantic world and China and S.E. Asia. He writes and lectures on post-Cold War geopolitics, U.S. foreign policy, European integration, and the complex interactions that shape the triangle US-EU/Germany-China. He also has a great interest in the history of the Cold War and the politics of Winston Churchill.

In short, Larres’ major research interests are threefold: 1. Current U.S. and EU/German economic and security policies toward China and S.E. Asia; 2. Transatlantic relations, U.S., German and British foreign policy, and European integration; and 3. International history of the 20th century, in particular the Cold War and the politics of Winston Churchill.
Lecture Series

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 292—Britain in World Affairs since 1945
  • HIST 397—Torn between the U.S. and Europe: Britain, Germany, and European Integration since World War II
  • HIST 490—The U.S. and the Cold War: International Perspectives
  • HIST 490—British Contemporary History from Churchill to the Present
  • HIST 890—Transatlantic Relations during the Cold War and Beyond: The U.S. and European Unity

Notable Publications:

  • Editor, The U.S. Secretaries of State and Transatlantic Relations (Routledge, 2010)
  • Editor, Companion to Europe since 1945 (Blackwell, 2009)
  • Churchill’s Cold War: The Politics of Personal Diplomacy (Yale University Press, 2002)
  • Editor (with the assistance of E. Meehan), Uneasy Allies: British-German Relations and European Integration since 1945 (Oxford University Press, 2000)
  • Politics of Illusion: Churchill, Eisenhower, and the German Question, 1945–1955 (Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1995) [written in German]

Miguel La Serna

August 3, 2017

Miguel La Serna

414 Hamilton Hall
laserna@email.unc.edu
919-962-3970


Research Interests:

Miguel La Serna is interested in the relationship between culture, memory, and political violence in twentieth-century Latin America. He is currently working on a study that explores the ways in which MRTA guerrillas and the Peruvian state used historical memory and nationalist symbolism to promote, achieve, and thwart revolutionary change in late-twentieth-century Peru.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 51—Ideology and Revolution in Latin America
  • HIST 242—U.S.-Latin American Relations
  • HIST 390—The Indian Question in Latin America
  • HIST 393—The Life and Times of Che Guevara
  • HIST 527—Latin American Indigenous Peoples
  • HIST 528—Guerrillas and Counterinsurgencies in Twentieth-Century Latin America

Notable Publications:

  • The Corner of the Living: Ayacucho on the Eve of the Shining Path Insurgency (UNC Press, 2012)
  • “Murió comiendo rata: Power Relations in Pre-Sendero Ayacucho, Peru, 1940–1983,” A Contracorriente Vol. 9 Issue 2 (Winter 2012), 1–34
  • “To Cross the River of Blood: How an Inter-Community Conflict is Linked to the Peruvian Civil War, 1940–1983,” in Power, Culture, and Violence in the Andes, eds. Christine Hunefeldt and Milos Kokotovic (Sussex Academic Press, 2009)

Lloyd S. Kramer

August 3, 2017

Lloyd S. Kramer

445 Hamilton Hall
lkramer@unc.edu
919-962-5553
Curriculum Vitae


Research Interests:

Lloyd Kramer’s interests focus on Modern European History with an emphasis on nineteenth-century France. He is particularly interested in historical processes that shape cultural identities, including the experiences of cross-cultural exchange and the emergence of modern nationalism. Other research and teaching interests deal with the roles of intellectuals in modern societies and the theoretical foundations of historical knowledge. His teaching stresses the importance of reading, discussing, and writing about influential books in various eras of European history and world history. One recurring theme in all of his research and teaching stresses the importance of cross-cultural exchanges in modern world history.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 151—European History to 1650
  • HIST 391—The Age of the Atlantic Revolutions
  • HIST 466—Modern European Intellectual History
  • HIST 772—Readings in the Intellectual History of Europe

Notable Publications:

  • Co-author, with R. R. Palmer and Joel Colton, of A History of Europe in the Modern World, 11th edition (McGraw-Hill, 2014)
  • Nationalism in Europe and America: Politics, Cultures, and Identities Since 1775 (UNC Press, 2011)
  • Lafayette in Two Worlds: Public Cultures and Personal Identities in an Age of Revolutions (UNC Press, 1996)
  • Co-editor, Learning History in America: Schools, Cultures and Politics (University of Minnesota Press, 1994)
  • Threshold of a New World: Intellectuals and the Exile Experience in Paris, 1830–1848 (Cornell University Press, 1988)

Michelle King

August 3, 2017

Michelle King

475 Hamilton Hall
mtking@email.unc.edu
919-962-5043
Curriculum Vitae


Research Interests:

Michelle King is interested in research subjects that deal with gender, the body, imperialism/colonialism, and a conscious consideration of the processes of cultural translation. She focuses on the cultural history of nineteenth and twentieth-century China, as well as Chinese diasporas. Her last book was a study of the cultural distinctions between Chinese and Western perspectives on female infanticide in late nineteenth century China. Her new book project will examine the intersection of gender, foodways, and transnational Chinese identities through the life and career of postwar Taiwan’s pioneering female cookbook author and television personality, Fu Pei-mei.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 285—Twentieth-Century China
  • HIST 284—Late Imperial China
  • HIST 550—Gender in Chinese History
  • HNRS 353—The Cultural History of Food in China
  • HIST 398—China Bound: Western Travel Writing on China

Notable Publications:

  • Editor, Culinary Nationalism in Asia (Bloomsbury Academic, 2019)
  • “The Julia Child of Chinese Cooking, or the Fu Pei-mei of French Food?: Comparative Contexts of Female Culinary Celebrity,” in Gastronomica 18.1 (February 2018), pp. 15-26
  • “Margaret Sanger in Translation: Gender, Class and Birth Control in 1920s China” in Journal of Women’s History 29.3 (Fall 2017), pp. 61-83
  • Between Birth and Death: Female Infanticide in Nineteenth-Century China (Stanford University Press, 2014)
  • “Working With/In the Archive,” in Research Methods for History, ed. Simon Gunn and Lucy Faire (Edinburgh University Press, 2012), 13–29
  • “Replicating the Colonial Expert: The Problem of Translation in the Late Nineteenth-Century Straits Settlements” in Social History 34.4 (November 2009), 428–46

Lauren Jarvis

August 3, 2017

Lauren Jarvis

Hamilton Hall
ljarvis@email.unc.edu

Curriculum Vitae


Research Interests:

Lauren Jarvis’s research focuses on the history of religion in sub-Saharan Africa, with an emphasis on twentieth-century South Africa. She is currently completing a book on the Nazaretha Church, one of the oldest and largest of the many faith healing churches that took root in southern Africa in the twentieth century. Jarvis sees religious history as a window into the ideas that matter in people’s daily lives, and her book examines the ways that involvement in new religious communities changed how people thought about the future. It is a history of collective hopes, dreams, and ambitions. Jarvis is also in the early stages of a second book-length project, which explores how Africans in southern Africa used the Bible to construct—and argue about—racial identities.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 130 – Twentieth Century Africa
  • HIST 279 – Modern South Africa
  • HIST 534 – African Diaspora

Notable Publications:

  • “A Chief is a Chief by the Women? The Nazaretha Church, Gender, and Traditional Authority in Mtunzini, South Africa, 1900-1948” Journal of African History 56:1 (2015).
  • “Gender, Violence, and Home in the Nazareth Baptist Church, 1906-1939” in Ekhaya: The Politics of Home in KwaZulu-Natal, eds. Meghan Elisabeth Healy and Jason Hickel (University of KwaZulu-Natal Press, 2014)

Konrad H. Jarausch

August 3, 2017

Konrad H. Jarausch

502 Hamilton Hall
jarausch@email.unc.edu
919-962-8083
Curriculum Vitae


Research Interests:

Konrad H. Jarausch has written or edited about forty books in modern German and European history. Starting with Hitler’s seizure of power and the First World War, his research interests have moved to the social history of German students and professions German unification in 1989/90, with historiography under the Communist GDR, the nature of the East German dictatorship, as well as the debate about historians and the Third Reich. More recently, he has been concerned with the problem of interpreting twentieth-century German history in general, the learning processes after 1945, the issue of cultural democratization, and the relationship between Honecker and Breshnew.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 159—Twentieth-Century Europe
  • HIST 462—Germany, 1815–1918
  • HIST 469—European Social History, 1815–1970
  • HIST 771—Readings in Nineteenth-Century European History
  • HIST 746—History and the Social Sciences
  • HIST 924—Seminar in Modern European History

Notable Publications:

  • Out of Ashes: A New History of Europe in the Twentieth Century (Princeton University Press, 2015), 880 pp.
  • Reluctant Accomplice: A Wehrmacht Soldier’s Letters from the Eastern Front (Princeton University Press, 2011)
  • “Das stille Sterben…”: Feldpostbriefe von Konrad Jarausch aus Polen und Russland (Paderborn: Schöningh, 2008)
  • Gebrochene Wissenschaftskulturen : Universität und Politik im 20. Jahrhundert (Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2010)
  • Shattered Past: Reconstructing German Histories (Princeton University Press, 2002)

Karen Hagemann

August 3, 2017

Karen Hagemann

562 Hamilton Hall
hagemann@unc.edu
919-962-3960
Curriculum Vitae
Personal Website


Research Interests:

Karen Hagemann teaches Modern German and European history, military history and women’s and gender history from the late eighteenth to the late twentieth century. Her most recent monograph Revisiting Prussia’s Wars against Napoleon: History, Culture, and Memory was published with Cambridge University Press in 2015 and won the Hans Rosenberg Prize for the best book in Central European History in 2016 by the Central European History Society. A German edition will come out 2019 with Schöningh. The volume Gendering Post-1945 German History: Entanglements, coedited with Donna Harsch and Friederike Brühöfener, was published by Berghahn Books in the spring 2019. The Oxford Handbook of Gender and War since 1600, coedited with Stefan Dudink and Sonya O. Rose, will be published by Oxford University Press in the fall 2019. Currently she is working on a monograph titled The Forgotten Soldiers: Women, the Military and War. Dr. Hagemann is also the project director of Digital Humanities Project “GWonline, the Bibliography, Filmography and Webography on Gender and War since 1600”.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 072-001—First Year Seminar: Women’s Voices: 20th Century European History in the Female Memory
  • HIST/EURO 252—Politics, Society and Culture in Modern Germany (1871–1945)
  • HIST/WMST 259—Towards Emancipation? Women in Modern Europe
  • HIST/PWAD 354—War and Gender in Movies
  • HIST 398—Nazi Germany and the Holocaust in Female Experience and Memory
  • HIST/WMST 500—Gender, Race and Nation in Europe and Beyond, 18th-20th C.
  • HIST/PWAD/WMST 517—Gender, Military, and War in Comparative Perspective
  • HIST/WMST 725—Comparative/Global Gender History: Gender History and the History of Masculinity in Comparative and Global Perspective
  • HIST/WMST 730— Feminist and Gender Theory for Historians
  • HIST 742—History and Memory: An Introduction into Theory, Methodology, and Research
  • HIST/WMST 770— Readings in European Women’s and Gender History
  • Notable Publications:

    • Gendering Post-1945 German History: Entanglements, ed. with Donna Harsch and Friederike Brühöfener (Berghahn Books, 2019)
    • War, Demobilization and Memory: The Legacy of War in the Era of Atlantic Revolutions, ed. with Alan Forrest and Michael Rowe (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016)
    • Revisiting Prussia’s Wars against Napoleon: History, Culture, and Memory (Cambridge University Press, 2015)
    • Halbtags oder Ganztags: Zeitpolitiken von Kinderbetreuung und Schule nach 1945 im europäischen Vergleich, ed. with Konrad H. Jarausch (Beltz-Juventa, 2015)
    • Gender and the Long Postwar: Reconsiderations of the United States and the Two Germanys, 1945–1989, ed. with Sonya Michel (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014)

    Joseph T. Glatthaar

    August 3, 2017

    Joseph T. Glatthaar

    504 Hamilton Hall
    jtg@email.unc.edu
    919-962-3974

    Personal Website


    Research Interests:

    Joseph Glatthaar specializes and teaches courses in the American Civil War and American military history on the undergraduate and graduate levels.

    Graduate Students:

    Courses Offered:

    HIST 127 – American to 1865
    HIST 368 – War and American Society to 1903
    HIST 369 – War and American Society, 1903 to Present

    Notable Publications:

    • The American Military: A Concise History (Oxford University Press, 2018)
    • Soldiering in the Army of Northern Virginia: A Statistical Portrait of the Troops Who Served under Robert E. Lee (UNC Press, 2011)
    • General Lee’s Army: From Victory to Collapse (New York: The Free Press, 2008)
    • Forgotten Allies: The Oneida Indians in the American Revolution, with James Kirby Martin (New York: Hill & Wang, 2006)
    • The Civil War in the West, 1863–1865 (Oxford: Osprey Publishing Co., 2001)
    • Partners in Command: Relationships Between Civil War Leaders (New York: The Free Press, 1994; Paperback edition The Free Press, 1996)
    • Forged in Battle: The Civil War Alliance of Black Soldiers and White Officers (New York: The Free Press, 1990; Paperback edition by Meridian, 1991; Paperback edition Louisiana State University Press, 1998)