Morgan Pitelka

August 7, 2017

Morgan Pitelka

GEC 3105
mpitelka@unc.edu
919-843-0130


Research Interests:

My research focuses on the history and material culture of the long sixteenth century (the shift from medieval to early modern) in Japan. I am particularly interested in the history of the samurai, the history of tea culture, the history of ceramics, and the methodology of material culture studies.

My first research project focused on the Raku ceramic tradition, which originated in the 1570s, thrived in the context of early modern tea culture, and continues to be widely practiced in Japan and around the world today. This project involved examination of ceramics in American and Japanese museums and private collections as well as study of documentary evidence including letters, tea diaries, gazetteers, early modern books, manuscripts, and collection registers. One goal was to illuminate how tradition is constructed, perpetuated, and packaged over time, and how sixteenth-century practices and products continue to inform debates about national identity in Japan today.

My second research project focused on the role of material culture—particularly swords, Chinese art, and falcons—in the life and career of the warlord Tokugawa Ieyasu (1543-1616), founder of the Tokugawa Shogunate, and a useful case study of the long sixteenth century.

My third research project examines daily life in late medieval castle towns such as Ichijôdani (near present-day Fukui), capital of the Asakura house of warlords, using archaeological remains and documentary evidence. This town was destroyed in 1573 by Oda Nobunaga, first of the so-called “Three Unifiers” of the sixteenth century. My project examines the tension between the top-down, political world view articulated in Asakura official documents, and the more textured markers of daily life—and its sudden loss—that emerge from the Ichijôdani excavations, as well as similar sites such as Bungo Funai, Azuchi, and Odawara.

Graduate Students:

  • Daniele Lauro (co-advised with W. Miles Fletcher)

Courses Offered:

  • ASIA 63: First-Year Seminar: Japanese Tea Culture
  • JAPN 231: Ancient and Medieval Japanese History and Culture
  • JAPN 246: Early Modern Japanese History and Culture
  • JAPN 363: Samurai, Monks, and Pirates: History and Historiography of Japan’s Long Sixteenth Century
  • JAPN 451: Swords, Tea Bowls, and Woodblock Prints: Exploring Japanese Material Culture
  • HIST 890: Material Culture and Material histories

Notable Publications:

  • Spectacular Accumulation: Material Culture, Tokugawa Ieyasu, and Samurai Sociability. Honolulu, HI: University of Hawai’i Press, 2016. Winner, 2016 Book Prize, Southeastern Conference of the Association of Asian Studies.
  • Kyoto Visual Culture in the Early Edo and Meiji Periods: The Arts of Reinvention. Co-edited with Alice Tseng. New York: Routledge, 2016.
  • What’s the Use of Art? Asian Visual and Material Culture in Context. Co-edited with Jan Mrazek. Honolulu, HI: University of Hawai’i Press, 2007.
  • Handmade Culture: Raku Potters, Patrons, and Tea Practitioners in Japan. Honolulu, HI: University of Hawai’i Press, 2005.
  • Japanese Tea Culture: Art, History, and Practice. Editor. London and New York: Routledge, 2003; paperback edition, 2007.

Jerma A. Jackson

August 7, 2017

Jerma A. Jackson

512 Hamilton Hall
jaj@email.unc.edu
919-962-8084


Research Interests:

Jerma A. Jackson’s main research interest is twentieth century social and cultural history, with a special interest on African American life, religion, music and women’s history. In her first book Jackson engaged music to examine black life and culture, tracing gospel from its beginnings as a mode of worship to its expansion into commercialized culture during the forties and fifties. Jackson uses the music to examine some of the mounting changes that unfolded in the twentieth century—expanding industrialization and urban migration, the growth of consumer values and materialism, and the emergence of mass produced culture.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 128—United States History Since 1865
  • HIST 569—African American Women’s History

Notable Publications:

  • Singing in My Soul: Black Gospel Music in a Secular Age (UNC Press, 2004)

Louis A. Pérez, Jr.

August 3, 2017

Louis A. Pérez, Jr.

550 Hamilton Hall
perez@email.unc.edu
919-962-3943
Curriculum Vitae


Research Interests:

Principal research interests center on nineteenth- and twentieth-century Caribbean, with emphasis on Spanish-speaking Caribbean. Current research explores the character of society and gender in nineteenth-century Cuba.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 143—Latin America Since Independence
  • HIST 531—History of the Caribbean
  • HIST 532—History of Cuba

Notable Publications:

  • Rice in the Time of Sugar: The Political Economy of Food in Cuba (University of North Carolina Press, 2019)
  • Intimations of Modernity: Civil-Culture in Nineteenth-Century Cuba. University of North Carolina Press: 2017.
  • The Structure of Cuban History: Meanings and Purpose of the Past (University of North Carolina Press, 2013)
  • Cuba: Between Reform and Revolution, 5th edition (Oxford University Press, 2014)
  • Cuba in the American Imagination: Metaphor and the Imperial Ethos (University of North Carolina Press, 2008)
  • To Die in Cuba: Suicide and Society (University of North Carolina Press, 2005)
  • On Becoming Cuban: Identity, Nationality and Culture (University of North Carolina Press, 1999)

Susan Dabney Pennybacker

August 3, 2017

Susan Dabney Pennybacker

507 Hamilton Hall
pennybac@email.unc.edu
919-962-2925
Curriculum Vitae


Research Interests:

Susan Dabney Pennybacker’s research centers upon the political culture of modern Britain and the former British Empire. Her book-in-progress, entitled Fire By Night, Cloud by Day: refuge and exile in postwar London (Cambridge), concerns the movement of individuals between metropolitan London and South Africa, Trinidad, India, and Europe between 1945 and 1994. It is based in both archival and ethnographic research conducted in London, New Delhi, Port of Spain, Cape Town and Johannesburg. She has a keen interest in visual media sources, especially documentary photography and film. Pennybacker is a founding member and co-convener of the Triangle Global British History Seminar and the Transnational and Global Modern History seminar. She is the Immediate Past President of the North American Conference on British Studies (NACBS), 2018-20, and an associate editor of the Journal of British Studies.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 164—The History of Britain in the 19th Century
  • HIST 165—The History of Britain in the 20th Century
  • HIST 398—Modern London: The Imperial Metropolis
  • HIST 490 (Honors)—Topics in British Imperial History, 1715–Present
  • HIST 722—Contemporary Global History
  • HIST 771—Topics in Modern European History
  • HIST 775—Studies in Modern English History

Notable Publications:

  • “A Cold War Geography: South African Anti-Apartheid Refuge and Exile in London, 1945-1994, in, Nathan Riley Carpenter and Benjamin N. Lawrence, eds., Africans in Exile: mobility, law and identity (Indiana University Press, 2018), 185-99.
  • “Anti-apartheid testimony: unmaking the histories of South African Jewish communists” in Carol S. Gould, Simone Gigliotti and Jacob Golomb, eds., Ethics, Art, and Representations of the Holocaust: Essays in Honor of Berel Lang (Lexington Books, Rowman and Littlefield, 2013)
  • “Afterword” in Robbie Aitken and Eve Rosenhaft, eds., Africa in Europe: Studies in Transnational Practice in the Long 20th Century (University of Liverpool Press, 2013)
  • From Scottsboro to Munich: Race and Political Culture in 1930s Britain (Princeton University Press, 2009)
  • A Vision for London, 1889–1914: Labour, Everyday Life and the London County Council Experiment (Routledge, 1995, paperback edition, 2013)

Fred Naiden

August 3, 2017

Fred Naiden

417 Hamilton Hall
naiden@email.unc.edu
919-962-3971
Curriculum Vitae


Research Interests:

Fred Naiden studies ancient Greek law, religion, and warfare, including Near-Eastern parallels, especially among the Western Semites. Chief periods of interest are the Classical and Hellenistic. Recently completed is a study of Alexander the Great, his officers, and the role of religion in Macedonian conquests, Soldier, Priest, and God, combining his interests in warfare, religion, and the Near East. Now underway is a study of war councils and command and control throughout antiquity and into the early modern period. The languages used for his research are Greek, Latin, Hebrew and Akkadian. For other publications, see the attached cv.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 225—History of Greece
  • HIST 392—Ancient Slavery
  • HIST 421—Greek Warfare
  • HIST 422—Alexander the Great
  • HIST 518-Topics in Military History
  • HIST 890—Seminars in Greek history, including Sacred Law and Alexander the Great

Notable Publications:

  • Soldier, Priest, and God: A Life of Alexander the Great (Oxford, 2018)
  • Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through the Roman Periods (Oxford, 2013)
  • Ancient Supplication (Oxford, 2006)

Michael Cotey Morgan

August 3, 2017

Michael Cotey Morgan

407 Hamilton Hall
morgan@unc.edu
919-843-4309


Research Interests:

Michael Cotey Morgan specializes in modern international and global history. His first book, The Final Act: The Helsinki Accords and the Transformation of the Cold War (Princeton University Press, 2018), examines the origins and consequences of the 1975 Helsinki Final Act, the most ambitious diplomatic undertaking of the Cold War and a watershed in the development of human rights. At UNC, he teaches courses on the history of diplomacy and international politics, the Cold War, and the history of human rights. Before coming to UNC, he taught at the US Naval War College and the University of Toronto, where he was the inaugural holder of the Raymond Pryke Chair.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 205—Statecraft, Diplomacy, and War, 1618-1815
  • HIST 206—Statecraft, Diplomacy, and War, 1815-1945
  • HIST 207—The Global Cold War
  • HIST 398—The Global 1970s
  • HIST 510—Human Rights in the Modern World
  • HIST 723—Readings in Global Cold War History

Notable Publications:

  • The Final Act: The Helsinki Accords and the Transformation of the Cold War (Princeton University Press, 2018).
  • “Helsinki 1975: Borders and People,” co-authored with Daniel Sargent (UC-Berkeley), Transcending the Cold War: Summits, Statecraft, and the Dissolution of Bipolarity in Europe, 1970-1990, ed. David Reynolds and Kristina Spohr (Oxford University Press, 2016).
  • “Confidence and Distrust at the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE),” Trust but Verify: The Politics of Uncertainty and the Transformation of the Cold War Order, 1969-1991, ed. Martin Klimke, Reinhild Kreis, and Christian Ostermann (Stanford University Press, 2016).
  • “The Ambiguities of Humanitarian Intervention,” The Power of the Past: History and Statecraft, ed. Hal Brands and Jeremi Suri (Brookings Institution Press, 2015).
  • “The Seventies and the Rebirth of Human Rights,” The Shock of the Global: The International History of the 1970s, ed. Niall Ferguson, Charles Maier, Erez Manela, and Daniel Sargent (Harvard University Press, 2010).
  • “The United States and the Making of the Helsinki Final Act,” Nixon in the World: American Foreign Relations 1969–1977, ed. Fredrik Logevall and Andrew Preston (Oxford University Press, 2008).
  • “North America, Atlanticism, and the Helsinki Process,” At the Roots of European Security: The Early Helsinki Process Revisited, 1965–1975, ed. Andreas Wenger, Vojtech Mastny, and Christian Nuenlist (Routledge, 2008).
  • “Michael Ignatieff: Idealism and the Challenge of the ‘Lesser Evil,’” International Journal 61:4 (Autumn 2006): 971–85.

Louise McReynolds

August 3, 2017

Louise McReynolds

421 Hamilton Hall
louisem@ad.unc.edu
919-962-3968
Curriculum Vitae


Research Interests:

Louise McReynolds’s research interests include Imperial Russia, with a particular focus on “middlebrow” culture. More specifically, she is interested in the development of mass communications and leisure-time activities, and how these helped to shape identities in the nineteenth century, leading up to the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution. She is currently exploring the role of archaeology in brokering the competing visions of “nationalism” and “imperialism” in Tsarist Russia. Her other interests include film history and theory, critical theory and cultures studies, and historiography.

Graduate Students:

  • Dakota Irvin (co-advised with Donald Raleigh)
  • Emily Lipira
    • Courses Offered:

      • HIST 161—Russia Becomes an Empire
      • HIST 302H—Movies Make History: Films as Primary Sources of American and European Histories, 1908–1991
      • HIST 393—Culture, Politics, and Identity in Late Imperial Russia, 1855–1917
      • HIST 480—Russia, 1796–1917
      • HIST 700—Introduction to Historical Methods and Research
      • HIST 781—Readings in Russian History, 1796–1917

      Notable Publications:

      • Murder Most Russian: True Crime and Punishment in Late Imperial Russia
        (Cornell, 2013)
      • Russia at Play: Leisure Activities at the End of the Tsarist Era (Cornell University Press, 2003)
      • Imitations of Life: Two Centuries of Melodrama in Russia, co-editor with Joan Neuberger (Duke University Press, 2001)
      • Entertaining Tsarist Russia: An Anthology of Popular Urban Cultural Sources in Late Imperial Russia, co-editor and co-translator, with James von Geldern (Indiana University Press, 1998). Includes a compact disk of songs and vaudeville routines.
      • Evdokiia Nagrodskaia, The Wrath of Dionysus, translator and editor (Indiana University Press, 1997)
      • The News Under Russia’s Old Regime: The Development of the Mass-Circulation Press (Princeton University Press, 1991)

Genna Rae McNeil

August 3, 2017

Genna Rae McNeil

415 Hamilton Hall
mcneilgr@email.unc.edu
919-962-8082


Research Interests:

Genna Rae McNeil’s areas of specialty are African-American History and U.S. social movements of the twentieth century. Within these areas, current research interests are civil rights, and civil liberties, African-American women and social movements, the African-American religious experience, youth movements, and African-American youth. She is completing a research project on Joan Little and “The ‘Free Joan Little’ Movement.” Additional research interests and forthcoming studies include focus on Women, Social Movements, Activism/Agency, Depression, and Incarceration/Prisons.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 395—Topics in African-American History
  • HIST 569—History of African-American Women
  • HIST 581—United States Constitutional History before the Civil War
  • HIST 582—United States Constitutional History after the Civil War
  • HIST 588—History of African-Americans to 1865
  • HIST 589—History of African-Americans, 1865 to Present
  • HIST 870—Readings in African-American History
  • HIST 942—Graduate Seminar in African-American History

Notable Publications:

  • Author (with co-authors Houston B. Roberson, Quinton H. Dixie and Kevin McGruder), Witness: Two Hundred Years of African American Faith and Practice at the Abyssinian Baptist Church of Harlem, New York, 1808–2008 (Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, October 2013)
  • Co-editor with Nancy Grant and Editor V.P. Franklin, African-Americans and Jews in the Twentieth Century: Studies in Convergence and Conflict (University of Missouri Press, 1999)
  • Co-editor, with John Hope Franklin, African Americans and the Living Constitution (Smithsonian Institution Press, 1995)
  • Co-editor, with Michael R. Winston, Historical Judgments Reconsidered (Howard University Press, 1988)
  • Groundwork: Charles Hamilton Houston and the Struggle for Civil Rights, Historical Judgments Reconsidered (University of Pennsylvania Press, 1983)

Terence V. McIntosh

August 3, 2017

Terence V. McIntosh

472 Hamilton Hall
terence_mcintosh@unc.edu
919-962-3969
Curriculum Vitae


Research Interests:

Terence McIntosh is a specialist of early modern Germany, especially its social, political, religious, and economic history in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. His current book project, “The Pastoral Disciplining of Illicit Sex: Godly Order, Enlightenment, and the Lutheran Clergy in Germany, 1550–1835,” examines how and why the pastorate’s powers to punish illicit sex changed significantly in the early modern period and how these changes shaped the clergy’s professional self-identity. Focusing on Saxony, Württemberg, and Brandenburg-Prussia, the study thus explores fundamental long-term transformations in the relations between church, state, and society.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 256—Origins of Modern Germany, 1356–1815
  • HIST 467—Society and Family in Early Modern Europe
  • HIST 478—War and Society in Early Modern Europe
  • HIST 763—Early Modern Germany

Notable Publications:

  • “Das ‘Werck der Christlichen Disciplin’ Herzog Ernsts des Frommen. Inspiration für die Glauchaer Kirchenzucht August Hermann Franckes?” Translated by Annegret Oehme. In Pietismus in Thüringen–Pietismus aus Thüringen. Religiöse Reform im Mitteldeutschland des 17. und 18. Jahrhunderts, pp. 51-69. Ed. Veronika Albrecht-Birkner and Alexander Schunka. Stuttgart: Franz Steiner Verlag, 2018.
  • “August Hermann Franckes Behandlung des Themas Kirchenzucht in seinem Collegium Pastorale.” Translated by Friederike Brühhöfener. In Hallesches Waisenhaus und Berliner Hof. Beiträge zum Verhältnis von Pietismus und Preußen, pp. 125-36. Ed. Holger Zaunstöck, Brigitte Klosterberg, Christian Soboth, and Benjamin Marschke. Halle: Verlag der Franckeschen Stiftungen, 2017.
  • “Pietists, Jurists, and the Early Enlightenment Critique of Private Confession in Lutheran Germany.” Modern Intellectual History 12, no. 3 (2015): 627-56, doi:10.1017/S1479244314000900 Published online 19 March 2015 (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1017/S1479244314000900).
  • “Pietism, Ministry, and Church Discipline: The Tribulations of Christoph Matthäus Seidel.” In Politics and Reformations: Histories and Reformations. Essays in Honor of Thomas A. Brady, Jr., pp. 397-424. Edited by Christopher Ocker, Michael Printy, Peter Starenko, Peter Wallace. Leiden: E.J. Brill, 2007.
  • Urban Decline in Early Modern Germany: Schwäbisch Hall and Its Region, 1650–1750 (UNC Press, 1997)

Malinda Maynor Lowery

August 3, 2017

Malinda Maynor Lowery

474 Hamilton Hall
mmaynor@email.unc.edu

Curriculum Vitae


Research Interests:

Malinda Maynor Lowery is a Professor of History at UNC-Chapel Hill and Director of the Center for the Study of the American South. She is a member of the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina. Her second book, The Lumbee Indians: An American Struggle, was published by UNC Press in September 2018. The book is a survey of Lumbee history from the eighteenth century to the present, written for a general audience. Her first book, Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South: Race, Identity, and the Making of a Nation (UNC Press, 2010), won several awards, including Best First Book of 2010 in Native American and Indigenous Studies and the Labriola American Indian Center National Book Prize from Arizona State University. She has written over fifteen book chapters or articles, on topics including American Indian migration and identity, school desegregation, federal recognition, religious music, and foodways, and has published essays in the New York Times, Oxford American, The North Star, and Scalawag Magazine. She has won fellowships and grants from the Mellon Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Sundance Institute, the Ford Foundation, and others. She has produced documentary films, including the Peabody Award-winning A Chef’s Life (5 seasons on PBS), the Emmy-nominated Private Violence (broadcast on HBO in 2014), In the Light of Reverence (broadcast on PBS in 2001), and two short films, Real Indian (1996), and Sounds of Faith (1997), both of which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 231—Native American History: The East (lecture)
  • HIST 234—Native American Tribal Studies: Lumbee History (undergraduate seminar)
  • HIST 395—Race and Ethnicity in the Twentieth Century (research seminar)
  • HIST 395—Research in Native American History
  • HIST 691H & 692H—Honors Thesis in History
  • HIST 716—Colloquium in U.S. History Since 1865 (graduate seminar)
  • HIST 878—Graduate Readings in Native American History

Notable Publications:

  • ”As We Cooked, As We Lived: Lumbee Foodways,” co-authored with Sara Wood, Southern Cultures (Spring 2015).
  • “Racial Science and Federal Recognition: Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South,” in Recognition, Sovereignty Struggles, and Indigenous Rights in the United States: A Sourcebook, eds. Jean M. O’Brien and Amy Den Ouden (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2013): 65-94.
  • Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South: Race, Identity, and the Making of a Nation (University of North Carolina Press, 2010)
  • “Telling Our Own Stories: Writing Lumbee History In the Shadow of the BAR,” American Indian Quarterly 33 (4)
  • “People and Place: Croatan Indians in Jim Crow Georgia, 1890–1920,” American Indian Culture and Research Journal, 21 (Spring 2005): 37–64

Filmography

  • Co-Producer, A Chef’s Life – documentary film series (PBS, Season 1, Fall 2013; Season 2, Fall 2014-Spring 2015).
  • Co-Producer, Private Violence – Video, 73 minutes (HBO, 2014).
  • Co-Producer, Survivor to Survivor: Native American Women and Domestic Violence – Video, 18 minutes (2011)
  • Co-Producer, In the Light of Reverence – Video, 73 minutes (PBS, 2001)
  • Producer/Director/Editor, Sounds of Faith – Video, 14 minutes (1997)
  • Producer/Director/Editor, Real Indian – 16mm, 7 minutes (1996)