Richard J. A. Talbert

August 7, 2017

Richard J. A. Talbert

516 Hamilton Hall
talbert@email.unc.edu
919-962-3942
Curriculum Vitae


Research Interests:

Richard Talbert’s research focuses primarily on Greek and Roman spatial perceptions (physical and cultural), and on mapping the classical world. He oversees the Ancient World Mapping Center (awmc.unc.edu) and its varied initiatives, including currently revision of his Atlas of Classical History, and work on the Great Marble Map of Rome in collaboration with Rome’s Sovrintendenza Capitolina and IUPUI. With Brian Turner (Portland State University, Oregon), he is now completing a translation of Pliny the Elder’s geographical books (Natural History 2-6) to be published by Cambridge University Press. He has a book on the mapping of Asia Minor (Turkey) during the late 19th and early 20th centuries in preparation.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 226—History of Rome
  • HIST 427—The Early Roman Empire, 14 A.D.–193 A.D.
  • HIST 428—The Later Roman Empire, 193 A.D.–378 A.D.
  • HIST 752—History of Rome, 27 B.C.–180 A.D. (seminar)
  • HIST 910—Seminar

Notable Publications:

  • Challenges of Mapping the Classical World (Routledge, 2018)
  • Roman Portable Sundials: The Empire in Your Hand (Oxford University Press, 2017)
  • Mercury’s Wings: Exploring Modes of Communication in the Ancient World (co-edited with F. S. Naiden, Oxford University Press, 2017)
  • Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World and Map-by-Map Directory (Princeton University Press, 2000; App for iPad 2013)
  • Ancient Perspectives: Maps and Their Place in Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome (Chicago University Press, 2012)
  • Rome’s World: The Peutinger Map Reconsidered (Cambridge University Press, 2010, paperback 2014)

John W. Sweet

August 7, 2017

John W. Sweet

520 Hamilton Hall
sweet@unc.edu



Research Interests:

Within the general field of Early American history, John Sweet’s research focuses on the dynamics of colonialism and on the interplay of religious cultures. His first book explored the encounters of Indians, Africans, and Europeans in New England and argued that the racial legacy of colonialism shaped the emergence of the American North as well as the South. He has also worked with other historians and literary scholars on the Jamestown colony and its broader cultural and international contexts. His current project is The Captive’s Tale: Venture Smith and the Roots of the American Republic.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 395—Sex and the Law
  • HIST 566—Sexuality in America

Notable Publications:

  • Biography and the Black Atlantic, co-edited with Lisa A. Lindsay (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013)
  • Bodies Politic: Negotiating Race in the American North, 1730–1830 (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003)

William Sturkey

August 7, 2017

William Sturkey

552 Hamilton Hall
wsturkey@live.unc.edu
919-962-1109


Research Interests:

William Sturkey is an historian of Modern America who specializes in the history of race in the American South, with a particular interest in the histories of working-class racial minorities. He teaches courses on Modern American History, Southern History, the Civil Rights Movement, and the History of America in the 1960s. His first book, To Write in the Light of Freedom, is a co-edited collection of newspapers, essays, and poems produced by African American Freedom School students during the Mississippi Freedom Summer of 1964. His second book, Hattiesburg: An American City in Black and White, is a biracial history of Southern Jim Crow that was published by Harvard University Press in March of 2019. Dr. Sturkey is currently working on a new project, tentatively titled To Be An American, which is a biography of the legendary Vietnam War hero Master Sergeant Roy Benavidez.

Dr. Sturkey works with graduate students in all fields of Modern American History. He is currently advising the talented Jennifer Standish and Laura Woods. Dr. Sturkey also serves on the Faculty Advisory Board of the UNC Center for the Study of the American South and the UNC Program in the Humanities. He also serves an elected representative on the UNC Faculty Athletics Council. During the 2017-2018 academic year, he was named one of two faculty recipients of the university-wide UNC Diversity and Inclusion Award for “significant contribution, time and effort of Carolina community members towards advancing an inclusive climate for excellence in teaching, research, public service and academic endeavor.” Dr. Sturkey is also an engaged public scholar who regularly gives public lectures, appears in local and national media, and works with K-12 teachers.

Graduate Students:

Dr. Sturkey is not currently accepting any new advisees for the upcoming 2020-2021 academic year.

Courses Offered:

  • History 89: First Year Seminar: Go Tell It On the Mountain: Black Life in the Fifties
  • History 128: American History since 1865
  • History 382: The History of the Civil Rights Movement
  • History 384: America in the 1960s
  • History 398: History Research Seminar, “The American Icon” & “My Hometown”
  • History 728: Graduate Colloquium in U.S. History since 1900

Notable Publications:

  • Hattiesburg: An American City in Black and White (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2019)
  • “Race and Reconciliation on the Gulf & Ship Island Railroad,” Southern Cultures, Vol. 24, No. 4 (Winter 2018): 87-104
  • Co-editor with Jon Hale, To Write in the Light of Freedom: The Newspapers of the 1964 Mississippi Freedom Schools (Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2015)
  • “‘Crafts of Freedom:’ The Poor People’s Corporation and Working-Class African American Women’s Activism for Black Power,” The Journal of Mississippi History, Vol. LXXIV, No. 1 (Spring 2012): 25–60
  • “‘I Want to Become Part of History:’ Freedom Summer, Freedom Schools, and the Freedom News,” The Journal of African American History, Vol. 95, No. 3 & 4 (Summer/Fall 2010): 348–368, Special Issue on “Black Print Culture”

Jay M. Smith

August 7, 2017

Jay M. Smith

564 Hamilton Hall
jaysmith@email.unc.edu
919-962-3949
Curriculum Vitae


Research Interests:

Jay M. Smith is a specialist of early-modern France, especially in the later seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Most of his work traces the negotiation of change over time, and he often uses the history of language to gain access to processes of change. Smith has written about the development of royal absolutism, the emergence of patriotic habits of thought under the old regime, the origins of the French Revolution, the history of the nobility, and the fascinating legend surrounding the beast of the Gévaudan. His most recent book, written with Mary Willingham, provides an exposé of the UNC athletic-academic scandal and an assessment of the educational culture fostered in big-time sport programs. He is now working on a comparative study of the emergent concept of political accountability in the eighteenth-century North Atlantic.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 84— (First Year Seminar)–Monsters, Murder and Mayhem in Microhistorical Analysis
  • HIST 309—Old Regime France, 1661-1787
  • HIST 310—The French Revolution
  • HIST 383— Big-Time College Sports and the Rights of Athletes, 1956-Present
  • HIST 516—Historical Time
  • HIST 711—Introductory Colloquium on Early Modern Europe
  • HIST 765—Problems in the History of the French Revolution

Notable Publications:

  • Cheated: The UNC Scandal, the Education of Athletes, and the Future of Big-Time College Sports (Potomac Books, 2015)
  • Monsters of the Gévaudan: The Making of a Beast (Harvard University Press: 2011)
  • The French Nobility in the Eighteenth Century: Reassessments and New Approaches (Penn State University Press, 2006)
  • Nobility Reimagined: The Patriotic Nation in Eighteenth-Century France (Cornell University Press, 2005)
  • The Culture of Merit: Nobility, Royal Service, and the Making of Absolute Monarchy in France, 1600–1789 (University of Michigan Press, 1996)

Sarah D. Shields

August 7, 2017

Sarah D. Shields

467 Hamilton Hall
sshields@email.unc.edu
919-962-8078
Curriculum Vitae
Personal Website


Research Interests:

Sarah Shields’s book, Fezzes in the River: Identity Politics and European Diplomacy in the Middle East on the Eve of World War II (Oxford University Press, 2011), is a social and diplomatic history of the contest between France and Turkey over the Sanjak of Alexandretta (1936–1940), an important coastal province. The book explores the development of Turkish nationalism and diplomacy in the early decades of the new republic, and analyzes French policy (and perfidy) as Paris struggled to balance her commitment to the League of Nations, promises to her Damascus protégés, and the need to protect her interests in the eastern Mediterranean as anxiety about war escalated. Her previous book, Mosul before Iraq: Like Bees Making Five-Sided Cells (State University Press of New York, 2000), analyzes the economy and society of nineteenth-century Mosul and the region surrounding it. She is currently researching the long-term impact of the League of Nations on the Middle East.

Graduate Students:

  • Ansev Demirhan (co-advised with Cemil Aydin)
  • Sofia Farah (Global Studies)

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 62—First Year Seminar: Nations, Borders, and Identities
  • HIST 138—Introduction to Islamic Civilization
  • HIST 139—Later Islamic Civilization
  • HIST 176H—A Century of Protest in the Middle East
  • HIST 273-Water in the Middle East
  • HIST 275—History of Iraq
  • HIST 276—The Modern Middle East
  • HIST 277—The Conflict Over Israel/Palestine
  • HIST 536—Revolution in the Modern Middle East
  • HIST 537—Women in the Middle East
  • HIST 538—The Middle East and the West

Notable Publications:

  • “Manufacturing Collective Identities: Contesting Territories in the Interwar Middle East: Antioch,” in Fatma Müge Göçek, ed. Contested Spaces in Contemporary Turkey: Politics of the Urban, Secular, Legal and Environmental (IB. Tauris, 2017)
  • “Teaching the Introductory Middle East History Survey Course,” Review of Middle East Studies 51 (2017), 35-39
  • “Forced Migration as Nation-Building: The League of Nations, Minority Protection, and the Greek-Turkish Population Exchange,” Journal of the History of International Law 18 (2016), 120-145
  • “The Greek-Turkish Population Exchange: Internationally Administered Ethnic Cleansing,” Middle East Report 279 (2013)
  • Fezzes in the River: Identity Politics and European Diplomacy in the Middle East on the Eve of World War II (Oxford University Press, 2011)
  • Mosul before Iraq (State University of New York Press, 2000) Translated into Arabic, 2008
  • “Mosul, the Ottoman Legacy, and the League of Nations,” International Journal of Contemporary Iraqi Studies, 3 (2009): 217–230
  • “Mosul Questions: Economy, Identity and Annexation,” in Reeva Simon, ed, The Making of Modern Iraq (Columbia University Press, 2004)
  • Turkey (National Geographic Countries of the World, 2009)

Daniel J. Sherman

August 7, 2017

Daniel J. Sherman

109 Hanes Art Center
dsherman@email.unc.edu

Curriculum Vitae


Research Interests:

Daniel Sherman’s research interest encompass the history of museums, monuments and commemorative practices in modern Europe and the United States, and the broad history of modernism in the visual arts in France. His current research explores the connections between archaeology, empire, and the media in France in the first half of the twentieth century.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 468: Art, Politics, and Society in France, 1850-1914
  • HIST 514: Monuments and Memory

Notable Publications:

  • Worthy Monuments: Art Museums and the Politics of Culture in 19th Century France (Harvard University Press, 1989)
  • Museum Culture: Histories, Discourses, Spectacles (co-edited; University of Minnesota Press, 1994)
  • The Construction of Memory in Interwar France (University of Chicago Press, 2000)
  • Museums and Difference (edited; Indiana University Press, 2008)
  • French Primitivism and the Ends of Empire, 1945-75 (University of Chicago Press, 2011)

Iqbal Singh Sevea

August 7, 2017

Iqbal Singh Sevea

413 Hamilton Hall
isevea@email.unc.edu



Research Interests:

Iqbal Singh Sevea is interested in the socio-cultural, political and intellectual histories of modern South Asia. His new book, The Political Philosophy of Muhammad Iqbal: Islam and Nationalism in Late Colonial India (Cambridge University Press, 2012), uses the controversial South Asian Muslim intellectual, Muhammad Iqbal (1877–1938), as a foil to a broader analysis of the engagement between Muslim intellectuals and western socio-political thought. Instead of assuming a fixed Islamic political tradition, the book explores contesting interpretations of Islam, which emerged in South Asia during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries often through deep entanglement with western political thought from Nietzsche to Marx.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 136—History of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh: South Asia since 1750
  • HIST 292—South Asia Since Independence: Society, Religion and Politics
  • HIST 292—Sex, Violence and Religion: Revolutionary Thought in Modern South Asia
  • HIST 393—Islam in Modern and Contemporary South Asia

Notable Publications:

  • “‘Kharaak Kita Oi!’: Masculinity, Caste and Gender in Pakistani Punjabi Films,” BioScope: South Asian Screen Studies (2014)
  • The Political Philosophy of Muhammad Iqbal: Islam and Nationalism in Late Colonial India (Cambridge University Press, 2012)
  • “Schooling the Muslim Nation: Muhammad Iqbal and Debates over Muslim Education in Colonial India,” South Asia Research, 31.1 (February 2011), 69–86
  • “The Ahmadiyya Print Jihad in South and Southeast Asia” in Islamic Connections: Muslim Societies in South and Southeast Asia, eds. M. Feener and T. Sevea (Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, 2009), 134–148

Donald M. Reid

August 7, 2017

Donald M. Reid

554 Hamilton Hall
dreid1@email.unc.edu

Curriculum Vitae


Research Interests:

Donald Reid is an historian of modern France. He is a labor historian, but works on the “long 1968” as an intellectual, social and political phenomenon and on the history of collective memory in modern France as well.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

  • HIST 140—The World Since 1945
  • History 256—France Since 1940
  • HIST 398—Undergraduate Seminar in History: A Change is Gonna Come: Ideologies and Practices of Liberation in the 1968 Years
  • HIST 776—Modern France
  • HIST 905—Dissertation Design

Notable Publications:

  • Opening the Gates: The Lip Affair, 1968-1981 (London: Verso Books, 2018).
  • Paris Sewers and Sewermen: Realities and Representations (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1991). Translated as Égouts et égoutiers de Paris: Réalités et représentations trans. Hélène Chuquet. Preface by Michelle Perrot (Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2014).
  • “The Red and the Black: Marie-Noëlle Thibault and the Novels of Dominique Manotti,” French Cultural Studies 26:3 (August 2015): 1-12.
  • “Le grand récit des établis (et ses multiples entrées),” Les Temps modernes 684-685 (July-October 2015): 34-53.
  • “Daniel Anselme: On Leave with the Unknown Famous,” South Central Review 32:2 (Summer 2015): 109-30.
  • Germaine Tillion, Lucie Aubrac, and the Politics of Memories of the French Resistance (Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2007); paperback with additions (2008).
  • Donald J. Raleigh

    August 7, 2017

    Donald J. Raleigh

    511 Hamilton Hall
    djr@email.unc.edu
    919-962-8077
    Curriculum Vitae


    Research Interests:

    Donald J. Raleigh’s research and teaching interests focus on twentieth-century Russian history. As a political and social historian, he wrote extensively on the Russian Revolution, with a particular emphasis on local history (the Saratov region). He also closely followed the evolution of historical writing in the Soviet Union and in this capacity edited the journal Soviet (Russian) Studies in History and the monograph series, The New Russian History. Access to long-sealed Soviet archives shaped his later work on the Russian civil war as did his interest in cultural history. More recently, Professor Raleigh has practiced oral history in the post-WWII period and is currently exploring biography as a historical genre. During the summer of 2011, Professor Raleigh launched research on a biography of Soviet leader Leonid Ilich Brezhnev, who served as General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union from 1964 until his death in 1982. Professor Raleigh has since conducted research in Moscow archives as well as in archives in Moldova and Kazakhstan. He also has contributed to a forthcoming publication of Brezhnev’s diaries to be released in Moscow.

    Graduate Students:

    Courses Offered:

    • HIST 64—Freshman Seminar: Gorbachev and the New Russia
    • HIST 90—Gorbachev’s Russia in Historical Perspective
    • HIST 162—Russia since 1861
    • HIST 264—Women in Russian and Soviet History, 1860–Present
    • HIST 390—Stalinism in Historical Perspective
    • HIST 391—Soviet Baby Boomers
    • HIST 477—Revolution in Russia, 1900–1930
    • HIST 478—Stalin and After: History of the Soviet Union and Russia, 1929–Present
    • HIST 782—Colloquium on Soviet History
    • HIST 783—An Introduction to Russian and East European History
    • HIST 925—Research Seminar in Russian and Soviet History

    Notable Publications:

    • Soviet Baby Boomers: An Oral History of Russia’s Cold War Generation (Oxford University Press, 2011)
    • Russia’s Sputnik Generation: Soviet Baby Boomers Talk about Their Lives (Indiana University Press, 2006)
    • Experiencing Russia’s Civil War: Politics, Society, and Revolutionary Culture in Saratov, 1917–1922 (Princeton University Press)
    • Provincial Landscapes: Local Dimensions of Soviet Power (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2001)
    • Revolution on the Volga: 1917 in Saratov (Cornell University Press, 1986)

    Cynthia Radding

    August 7, 2017

    Cynthia Radding

    513 Hamilton Hall
    radding@email.unc.edu
    919-962-5057
    Curriculum Vitae
    Personal Website


    Research Interests:

    Cynthia Radding’s research interests in Latin American colonial history focus on the intersections between environmental and ethnographic history. Her current work exemplifies methods for comparative history, across North and South America and within the broad borderlands region of northern Mexico and southwestern U.S. Her scholarship is rooted in the imperial borderlands of the Spanish and Portuguese American empires, emphasizing the role of indigenous peoples and other colonized groups in shaping those borderlands and transforming their landscapes. Her current project, “Bountiful Deserts, Imperial Shadows,” explores the ecological transition between wild and cultivated plants, the cultural intersections of sedentary and nomadic peoples, and the production of knowledge in northern Mexico.

    Graduate Students:

    Courses Offered:

    • HIST 240—Introduction to History of Mexico: A Nation in Four Revolutions
    • HIST 529—Mexico, 1750–1870: Citizenship and Conflict in a New Nation
    • HIST 393—Senior Seminar in Environmental History
    • HIST 713—Space, Territoriality, and the Creation of Regions in Colonial Ibero-America.
    • HIST 820—Ethnohistory as a Transdisciplinary Field
    • LTAM 697—Senior Research Capstone Seminar

    Notable Publications:

    • Borderlands in World History, 1700-1914, co-edited with Paul Readman and Chad Bryant, London and New York: Palgrave MacMillan, 2014
    • “The Children of Mayahuel: Agaves, Human Cultures, and Desert Landscapes in Northern Mexico,” Environmental History 17 (January 2012): 84-115
    • Landscapes of Power and Identity. Comparative Histories in the Sonoran Desert and the Forests of Amazonia from Colony to Republic (Duke University Press, 2005)