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A. Dirk Moses

July 2, 2020

A. Dirk Moses

453 Hamilton Hall
dirkmoses@unc.edu
(919) 962-2115
Curriculum Vitae
Personal Website


Research Interests:

Raised in Australia of parents with professional interests in German history, Dirk naturally gravitated to the study of the Australian and German pasts. While completing his first book, German Intellectuals and the Nazi Past (2007), he edited three anthologies on genocide and colonialism: Genocide and Settler Society: Frontier Violence and Stolen Indigenous Children (2004), Colonialism and Genocide (2007), and Empire, Colony Genocide: Conquest, Occupation and Subaltern Resistance in World History (2008). Since then, he has been researching postcolonial conflict in Africa and South Asia for his project on the “Diplomacy of Genocide.” His investigation of the origins and function of the genocide concept appears in his second monograph, The Problems of Genocide (2021). Dirk is also working on a book called “Genocide and the Terror of History” about traumatic memory and the constitution of genocidal subjectivities. In his spare time, he edits the Journal of Genocide Research.

Graduate Students:

Courses Offered:

HIST 508.001: Europe and Humanitarian Aid
HIST 178h.002: Liberalism, Socialism and Fascism in Europe
HIST 152: European History since 1650
HIST 466: Modern European Intellectual History

Notable Publications:

  • The Problems of Genocide: Permanent Security and the Language of Transgression (Cambridge University Press, 2021)
  • Decolonization, Self-Determination, and the Rise of Global Human Rights Politics (Cambridge University Press, 2020). Edited with Roland Burke and Marco Duranti
  • The Holocaust in Greece (Cambridge University Press, 2018). Edited with Giorgos Antoniou
  • Postcolonial Conflict and the Question of Genocide: The Nigeria-Biafra War, 1967–1970 (Routledge, 2018). Edited with Lasse Heerten
  • Colonial Counterinsurgency and Mass Violence: The Dutch Empire in Indonesia (Routledge, 2014). Edited with Bart Luttikhuis
  • Erik Gellman

    August 28, 2018

    Erik Gellman


    egellman@unc.edu
    919-445-4647
    Curriculum Vitae


    Research Interests:

    Erik S. Gellman researches and teaches about working-class and urban life, visual culture, and comparative social movements in modern American history. He’s the author of Death Blow to Jim Crow: The National Negro Congress and the Rise of Militant Civil Rights (UNC Press, 2012) and The Gospel of the Working Class: Labor’s Southern Prophets in New Deal America (IL Press, 2011, coauthor Jarod Roll).

    His next book, Troublemakers: Chicago Freedom Struggles through the Lens of Art Shay (University of Chicago Press and funded through an NEH Public Scholar grant and the Gage Gallery in Chicago), will offer a synthetic textual and visual narrative of Chicago’s postwar urban history and protest politics. He’s collaborating on two research and publication projects: an edited volume called New Black Chicago Histories (Black Metropolis Research Consortium and University of IL Press) and a 1930s-1940s labor and political history called, Organizing Agribusiness from Farm to Factory: A New Food and Labor History of America’s Most Diverse Union. Gellman also serves as contributing editor to Labor: Studies in Working-Class History and is co-program chair for the upcoming 2019 Labor and Working-Class History Association (LAWCHA) conference in Durham. From 2006-2018, Gellman taught History and African American Studies at Roosevelt University in Chicago.

    Graduate Students:

  • Christian Roberto Walk
  • Benjamin Fortun
  • Courses Offered:

    HIST 89 – First Year Seminar: Special Topic, Rebuilding the Modern South: Work and Identity in Modern History
    HIST 128 – American History since 1865
    HIST 890 – Urban America, Rural America
    HIST 365 – The Worker and American Life.
    HIST 584 – The Promise of Urbanization: American Cities in the 19th and 20th Centuries.

    Notable Publications:

    • “Black Freedom Struggles and Ecumenical Activism in 1960s Chicago” in Chris Cantwell, Heath Carter, and Janine Drake, editors, Between the Pew and the Picket Line: Christianity and the Working Class in Industrial America (University of Illinois Press, March 2016).
    • Death Blow to Jim Crow: The National Negro Congress and the Rise of Militant Civil Rights, University of North Carolina Press, John Hope Franklin series, 2012 (paperback, 2014).
    • The Gospel of the Working Class: Labor’s Southern Prophets in New Deal America, coauthor Jarod Roll, University of Illinois Press, 2011 (paperback and hardcover, winner of the H.L. Mitchell Prize of the Southern Historical Association, 2012).
    • “In the Driver’s Seat: Chicago’s Bus Drivers and Labor Insurgency in the Era of Black Power,” Labor: Studies in Working-Class History of the Americas 11:3 (Fall 2014).
    • “Charles White and the Laboring of the African American Artistic Renaissance,” in Darlene Clark Hine, editor, The Black Chicago Renaissance (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2012).

    Joseph W. Caddell

    August 9, 2018

    Joseph W. Caddell

    409 Hamilton Hall
    caddellj@email.unc.edu
    919.843.4517


    Research Interests:

    History of sea power, history of air power

    Graduate Students:

    There are no graduate students studying under this faculty member at this time.

    Courses Offered:

    • HIST212–History of Sea Power
    • HIST213–Air Power and Modern Warfare

    Notable Publications:

    Matthew Andrews

    August 9, 2018

    Matthew Andrews

    515 Hamilton Hall
    andrewsm@email.unc.edu



    Research Interests:

    Matthew Andrews is an American historian with an interest in the links between sports and American history and culture. He is particularly interested in the ways sports both reflect and affect American politics, race and gender identities, and social reform movements.

    Contacting Me

    My Fall 2020 advising office hours will be held remotely. There are two ways you can see me:
    You can make an appointment to see me Mondays 3:00-5:00 p.m. via the UNC advising website. Log in and search for my name to make a 30-minute appointment during those times. We will then meet via Zoom.

    I also hold Zoom “drop in” office hours Tuesdays 1:30-3:30 p.m. There is no appointment needed for these times. To see me during this two-hour window, enter my Zoom Meeting ID: 868 808 3968 For these office hours I will meet with students on a first-come first-serve basis. If you attend these office hours and I am busy meeting with another student, you will be directed to a virtual “waiting room.”

    Graduate Students:

    Courses Offered:

    • HIST 120: Sport and American History
    • HIST 127: The US to 1865
    • HIST 128: The US since 1865
    • HIST 220: The Olympic Games—A Global History
    • HIST 362: Baseball and American History
    • HIST 398: Sport and Civil Rights Research Seminar
    • HIST 398: Sport and Politics in the 1980s Research Seminar
    • HIST 398: Boxing and American History Research Seminar
    • HIST 585: Race, Basketball, and the American Dream

    Notable Publications:

    DeSimone, Joseph

    July 26, 2018

    DeSimone, Joseph






    Research Interests:

    Graduate Students:

    There are no graduate students studying under this faculty member at this time.

    Courses Offered:

    Notable Publications:

    Molly Worthen

    April 11, 2018

    Molly Worthen

    506 Hamilton Hall
    mworthen@unc.edu


    Personal Website


    Research Interests:

    Molly Worthen’s research focuses on North American religious and intellectual history, particularly the ideas and culture of conservative Christianity. Her most recent book examines American evangelical intellectual life since 1945. Worthen teaches courses in global Christianity, North American religious and intellectual culture, and the history of politics and ideology. In 2017 she received the Manekin Family Award for Teaching Excellence in Honors Carolina. She is also a contributing opinion writer for the New York Times and has written about religion and politics for the New Yorker, Slate, the American Prospect, Foreign Policy, and other publications.

    Graduate Students:

    Courses Offered:

  • HIST 121—History of Religion in North America
  • HIST 249—World Christianity since 1450
  • HIST 359—Global Evangelicalism since 1600
  • HIST 360—Modern American Intellectual History
  • HIST 398—Sin and Evil in Modern America
  • HIST 728—Introductory Colloquium in United States History since 1900
  • HIST 905—Dissertation Design
  • Problems in American Religious History
  • Notable Publications:

    • Apostles of Reason: The Crisis of Authority in American Evangelicalism (Oxford University Press, 2013)
    • The Man On Whom Nothing Was Lost: The Grand Strategy of Charles Hill (Houghton Mifflin, 2006)
    • “The Chalcedon Problem: Rousas John Rushdoony and the Origins of Christian Reconstructionism” Church History 77 No. 2 (June 2008)
    • New York Times Articles

    Brett E. Whalen

    August 7, 2017

    Brett E. Whalen

    457 Hamilton Hall
    bwhalen @email.unc.edu
    919-962-2383
    Curriculum Vitae
    Personal Website


    Research Interests:

    Brett Edward Whalen works on Christian intellectual and cultural history during the European Middle Ages, mainly focusing on the eleventh through the thirteenth centuries. He has published works on the crusades, apocalypticism, pilgrimage, and the medieval papacy. His first book, Dominion of God: Christendom and Apocalypse in the Middle Ages (Harvard, 2009), explores the medieval belief that Christianity would spread to every corner of the earth before the end of time. His most recent book, The Two Powers: The Papacy, the Empire, and the Struggle for Sovereignty in the Thirteenth Century (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2019), reappraises the epoch-making clashes between two popes, Gregory IX and Innocent IV, and the Hohenstaufen emperor, Frederick II.

    Graduate Students:

  • Spencer Scott
  • Emma Hall Kessel
  • Courses Offered:

    • HIST 50 (FYS)—Time and the Medieval Cosmos (co-taught with Chris Clemens)
    • HIST 107—Introduction to Medieval History
    • HIST 177H—The Apocalypse in the Christian Middle Ages (Honors Seminar)
    • HIST 228—The Medieval Expansion of Europe
    • HIST 398—The Crusades (Research Seminar)
    • HIST 431—The Medieval Church
    • HIST 432—The Crusades
    • HIST 701—Medieval Studies (Graduate Seminar)

    Notable Publications:

    • The Two Powers: The Papacy, the Empire, and the Struggle for Sovereignty in the Thirteenth Century (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2019)
    • The Medieval Papacy (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014)
    • Pilgrimage in the Middle Ages (University of Toronto Press, 2011)
    • “Corresponding with Infidels: Rome, the Almohads, and the Christians of Thirteenth-Century Morocco,” The Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 41 (2011): 487–513
    • Dominion of God: Christendom and Apocalypse in the Middle Ages (Harvard University Press, 2009)

    Harry L. Watson

    August 7, 2017

    Harry L. Watson

    568 Hamilton Hall
    hwatson@email.unc.edu
    919-962-0977
    Curriculum Vitae


    Research Interests:

    Harry Watson’s research interests lie in the political, social, cultural, and intellectual history of the United States between the Revolution and the Civil War, with special attention to the antebellum South and Jacksonian America. His work has explored the intersection of social, economic, and political change in this period, the formation of political parties, the influence of market development on political mobilization, reform movements, uses of the environment, and the relationship between race and class under slavery. He directed the UNC Center for the Study of the American South from 1999 to 2012, and edited its quarterly journal, Southern Cultures, from 1993 to 2019. He has served as president of the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic in 2010–2011 and the Historical Society of North Carolina.

    Graduate Students:

    Courses Offered:

    • HIST 127—United States History to 1865
    • HIST 366—North Carolina History to 1865
    • HIST 398—Before the War: Exploring the Antebellum American South
    • HIST 563—Jacksonian America, 1815–1848
    • HIST 586—The Old South
    • HIST 727—Introductory Colloquium in United States History, 1788 to 1900
    • HIST 835—Readings in the Antebellum South

    Notable Publications:

    • “On the Banks of the James or the Congaree: Antebellum Political Economy,” in Craig Thompson Friend and Lorri Glover, eds., Reinterpreting Southern Histories: Essays in Historiography (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2020), 166-196. With John D. Majewski.
    • “Democrats and Whigs: The Second American Party System,” Paula Baker and Donald Critchlow, eds., The Oxford Handbook of American Political History, Oxford University Press, 2020.
    • Building the American Republic: A Narrative History to 1877, Volume I. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2018)
    • “The Man with the Dirty Black Beard: Race, Class, and Schools in the Antebellum South,” Journal of the Early Republic 32, 1 (Spring 2012), 1–26
    • Liberty and Power: The Politics of Jacksonian America. 2nd rev. ed., with new Preface and Afterword (Hill & Wang, Inc., 2006)
    • “The Common Rights of Mankind: Subsistence, Shad, and Commerce in the Early Republican South,” The Journal of American History, vol. 83, no. 1 (June 1996), 13–43
    • An Independent People: The Way We Lived in North Carolina, 1770–1820 (University of North Carolina Press, 1983)
    • Jacksonian Politics and Community Conflict: The Emergence of the Second American Party System in Cumberland County, North Carolina (Louisiana State University Press, 1981)

    Katherine Turk

    August 7, 2017

    Katherine Turk

    500 Hamilton Hall
    kturk@email.unc.edu

    Curriculum Vitae


    Research Interests:

    Katherine Turk specializes in the histories of women, gender and sexuality; law, labor and social movements; and the modern United States. Her first book, Equality on Trial: Gender and Rights in the Modern American Workplace (Politics and Culture in Modern America Series, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016), examines how sex equality law has remade the world of work, eroding some inequalities and affirming others. Equality on Trial won the 2017 Mary Jurich Nickliss Prize in US Women’s and/or Gender History from the Organization of American Historians, and the dissertation from which it is drawn received the OAH’s Lerner-Scott Prize.

    Professor Turk was a Jerome Hall Postdoctoral Fellow at Indiana University’s Maurer School of Law in 2011-12 and the 2018-9 Mary I. Bunting Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University. Her research has been supported by the American Society for Legal History, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Humanities, among others. Her current projects include a history of men’s incorporation into women’s rights campaigns and, with Leandra Zarnow, a study of the origins and intellectual trajectory of the field of women’s history. Her next book, A Dangerous Sisterhood: The Lost History of the National Organization for Women, will be published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

    Graduate Students:

    Courses Offered:

    • HIST 89: Gender and the Law in United States History
    • HIST 144/WMST 144: Women in United States History
    • HIST 289: America in the 1970s (co-taught with Benjamin Waterhouse)
    • HIST 356: United States Women’s History from 1865
    • HIST 361/WMST 360: United States Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Histories
    • HIST 389/WMST 389: Maid in America, Made in China: Laboring Women in Global Perspective
    • HIST 398: Social Movements in the Twentieth Century United States
    • HIST 475/WMST 476: American Feminist Movements Since 1945
    • HIST 890: Women, Gender and Sexuality in United States History

    Notable Publications:

    • “ ‘With Wages So Low How Can a Girl Keep Herself?’: Protective Labor Legislation and Working Women’s Expectations,” Journal of Policy History 27 (Spring 2015): 250-74
    • “ ‘The Hand that Rocks the Cradle Should Rock the U. of C.’: The Faculty Wife and the Feminist Era,” Journal of Women’s History 26 (Summer 2014): 113-134
    • “Labor’s Pink-Collar Aristocracy: The National Secretaries’ Association’s Encounters with Feminism in the Age of Automation,” LABOR: Studies in Working-Class History of the Americas 11 (Summer 2014): 85-109
    • “ ‘Our Militancy is in Our Openness’: Gay Employment Rights Activism in California and the Question of Sexual Orientation in Sex Equality Law,” Law and History Review 31 (May 2013): 423-469
    • “Out of the Revolution, Into the Mainstream: Employment Activism in the NOW Sears Campaign and the Growing Pains of Liberal Feminism,” Journal of American History 97 (September 2010): 399-423

    Michael Tsin

    August 7, 2017

    Michael Tsin

    460 Hamilton Hall
    tsin@email.unc.edu
    919-962-5554


    Research Interests:

    Michael Tsin’s current research focuses on exploring the social processes of identity formation through the prism of late nineteenth and twentieth century China. The project is part of his ongoing interest in the historical processes through which ideas and practices were translated into established norms and values, disseminated through the social body, transplanted across different times and places, and contested and challenged by the populace. At a broader level, he is curious to learn more about how the forces of global capitalism, whether through the instrument of formal colonial possessions in the last century or through the mechanisms of transnational institutions in the twenty-first century, manage to continually make and unmake the world in its different forms.

    Graduate Students:

    Courses Offered:

    • HIST 133—Introduction to Chinese History
    • HIST 292—Unity and Difference in Twentieth-century China
    • GLBL 390—Colonization, Migration, and National Identity
    • HIST 398—Mao Zedong and the Chinese Cultural Revolution
    • HIST 890—Colonial Encounters

    Notable Publications:

    • Worlds Together, Worlds Apart: A History of the World From 1000 CE to the Present, 4th edition (Norton, 2014), in collaboration with Robert Tignor et al.
    • “Overlapping Histories: Writing Prison and Penal Practices in Late Imperial and Early Republican China,” Journal of World History, 20:1 (March 2009), 69–97
    • “Rethinking ‘State and Society’ in Late Qing and Republican China,” in Jens Damm and Mechthild Leutner, eds., China Networks, Berliner China-Hefte/Chinese History and Society, 35 (LIT [Münster], 2009), 20–32
    • Nation, Governance, and Modernity in China: Canton, 1900–1927, paperback edition (Stanford, 2002)